Design Museum shows Fredrikson Stallard

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The Design Museum in London has sent us images of a new installation by Fredrikson Stallard, which opened yesterday.

The installation, in the Design Museum Tank capsule gallery beside the River Thames, features two of Fredrikson Stallard's new Bergère chairs rotating on motorised bases.

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The chairs are part of a forthcoming furniture collection by Fredrikson Stallard and were previewed at Design Miami last December (see dezeen's earlier story here).

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Below is an explanation of the installation provided by the Design Museum:

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Bergère chair by FredriksonStallard

Design Museum Tank Installation, 2 February to 1 March 2007

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From dark and brooding to boisterous and brazen, the designs of Patrik Fredrikson and Ian Stallard explore notions of opulence and sensual darkness to create furniture and products that are rich and conceptually challenging.

From 2 February to 1 March the Design Museum Tank is showing the Bergère Chair, the much anticipated first preview from the forthcoming collection by FredriksonStallard, launching in May at the David Gill Galleries.

Part of a new breed of avant-garde designers for whom narrative is paramount, the London-based designers have been collaborating since 1995 and launched their design partnership in 2005. Both graduates of Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, FredriksonStallard have earned international renown for their idiosyncratic style and alchemist’s approach to materials.

In this new work– an upscaled version of their Bergère chair – FredriksonStallard have wrapped sensual rubber with hand beaten polished stainless steel to create expressive forms with barefaced cheek. As they say of the chairs, like “caramelised candy extracted from the discotheque, or as the desperate lap-dancer clinging to her polished stick."

All layers of traditional upholstery and signifiers of domesticity have been ripped out and replaced with an industrial aesthetic and honesty of materials that is characteristic ofFredriksonStallard’s work. This fusion contradicts perceived notions of homely comfort.

Indeed, contradiction is often at the heart of their work as they juxtapose seemingly incongruous materials and forms to create works that look both forward and backward in one glance.

For FredriksonStallard these objects evoke both historical mannerism and aspiring futurism. They are, as the designers say, “balancing on the ridge between the traditions of the past and the dreams of the future and with a healthy disregard for the conventions of both. They give us a glimpse of another, barely tangible reality – a reality where all things are deeper, darker and altogether more fantastic."

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Posted on Friday, February 9th, 2007 at 12:58 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

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