Reebok Flash store by Formavision

| 14 comments

reebok-flash-store-by-formavision-polkasqu.jpg

American designers Formvision have created a pop-up store for sportswear brand Reebok in New York, USA.

reebok-flash-store-by-formavision_back.jpg

Located in a 3,000 square-foot gallery space, the shop sells limited edition shoes and clothing designed in collaboration with visual artists Rolland Berry, John Maeda and the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, alongside Reebok shoes designed in the 1980's.

reebok-flash-by-formvision-7.jpg

"The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns," say Formavision.

reebok-flash-by-formvision-8.jpg

The store will remain open until 15 December.

The following is from Formavision:

--

Formavision develops “Reebok Flash,” Reebok’s first ever pop-up store
 169 Bowery @ Delancey, New York City 
Open Tuesday to Sunday, 11am to 7pm | Nov. 15 - Dec. 15, 08

On Saturday November 15th 2008, British sportswear company Reebok unveiled “Reebok Flash”, the brand's first ever pop-up store. Located in a 3,000 square-foot gallery space on the Bowery, “Flash” will be open daily until December 15th, and will feature limited-edition sneakers and exclusive apparel collections designed in collaboration with renowned visual artists Rolland Berry, John Maeda and the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

reebok-flash-by-formvision-9.jpg

“Reebok Flash” will also relaunch several of the company's most popular sneaker lines from the 1980s, including the groundbreaking Pump and the iconic freestyle series, which became synonymous with stylistic and technological breakthroughs in the spheres of aerobics and cross training. 
 
Experiential design and creative services agency Formavision, which conceived and developed the concept store, took inspiration from Vorticsim, an English arts movement from the early 20th century noted for its dynamic interpretation of Cubist and Futurist principles.

reebok-flash-store-by-formavision_reflection-1.jpg

Combining Vorticism's vibrant aesthetic with an assortment of cultural cues ranging from Purple Rain to Miami Vice, Flash Dance to Thriller, Formavision sought to capture the pop spirit of the 80s in order to create the ideal environment to reintroduce these classic styles from Reebok."The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns, a camouflaging technique reminiscent of the Royal Navy’s dazzle ship graphics from the First World War," notes Formavision founder and creative director Sebastien Agneessens.

reebok-flash-store-by-formavision_pump.jpg

"Our intent is to provoke and perhaps confound visitors by making them feel as if they are stepping into a poster rather than a store.” 
 
Formavision is a New York-based experiential design studio that specializes in creating branded environments and cultural content to support and activate non-traditional marketing strategies. Since its inception in 2003, Formavision has been connecting its clients with key tastemakers and members of the creative community by conceiving and deploying projects that include the Diesel Denim Gallery, Lexus Light & Speed, the World of Coca-Cola, and the Starbucks Salon.

reebok-flash-by-formvision-3.jpg

reebok-flash-store-by-formavision_neonbar_s.jpg

  • StanJoukIsHot

    Wow, that looks the coolest!

  • junihaoni

    its attractive…perhaps too attractive till i hardly notice the shoes nor any other reebok products..

  • Nacho goano

    flogger shop!!!! bad lightning or bad photografs?

  • Xit

    Very inkeeping with the products, neon 80’s flashback, just need michael J fox serving in there.

  • http://www.coordination-berlin.de Flip Sellin

    check their site. They pick up on vibes.
    They have my respect. And should continue…

  • Jonathan End

    im agree with junihaoni.
    too ‘noisy’, too flashy, it steals the attention from the products.

  • Ren

    ^too ‘noisy’, too flashy

    Thats what this style is all about, loud vibrating, clashing colors, apart from doing a typical white stand so the products stand off, what else can you do ?

  • paris-moi

    Some cool moments here. Who designed it though?
    I always thought that Fomavision were ‘curators’ for corporate art projects. Basically a person/group to connect companies with an installation artist to make a cool statement for the brand to help sales.
    Are they the designers now? It always bothered me that the designer/artist’s name always seemed to come second to Formavision’s name (the curator) in Formavision-organized projects. But maybe this time they played the roll of designer? Or are they overshadowing someone again? Who designed this space?

  • pau

    the worst thing is to make sth whitch is almost great

  • http://www.forumcad.com Taner Şaşmaz

    Very inkeeping with the products, and very nica

    perhaps too attractive till i hardly notice the shoes nor any other reebok products

  • http://www.ddsao.com D.D.S.a.o.

    Paris-moi and co. Formavision collaborated with design firm D.D.S.a.o. on this pop-up store. Salut.

  • http://www.formavision.info Sebastien Agneessens

    Hey, this is Sebastien with Formavision. Thanks all for the feedback. To answer your question about “over-shadowing the artists”, more and more of our projects are design-oriented, and we handle design in-house or with freelance collaborators.

    Credits for Reebok Flash are as follow: Creative direction & Design: Sebastien Agneessens // Architecture & Design: Jeroen de Schrijver & Ellen Depoorter // Graphic design: Jonas Hjertberg & Mai Kato // Painting: Shinya Nakamura // Production: Chris Hoover.

  • http://liftnewyork.com BOB/PROJECTS

    very innovative and a inspirational project. The abstract quality of the 3d forms and the graphic combination work great to activate space. Unfortunitly I did not see it in person but the photo scream success.

  • http://www.b74.net Yüksek lisans

    To answer your question about “over-shadowing the artists”, more and more of our projects are design-oriented, and we handle design in-house or with freelance collaborators.