Saving/Space/Vase by Joe Velluto

| 18 comments

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Milan 09: Italian designer Joe Velluto has designed a plastic vase that is crushed beneath a giant metal block after being moulded.

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The process echoes the way plastic water bottles are crushed after use, creating a new form.

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The Saving/Space/Vase will be exhibited at Spazio Rossana Orlandi in Milan next month, during the international furniture fair.

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The vase will be part of the Plasticism exhibition of products from the Plust Collection.

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Here's some text from Velluto:

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PLASTICISM by PLUST Collection (www.plust.com) 22-27 April 2009 Spazio Rossana Orlandi Mutations, reflections and experimentations around plastic: as to say Plasticism.

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PLUST Collection presents a new approach based on manufacturing processes and innovative finishes derived from the moulding of plastic with changes, transformation and renewal as core matters.

Design ventures in brand-new paths in the search of innovative styles: from a carefully study of the material follow the processes of elaboration, melting, pressure and transformation able to turn weaknesses into strengths. Mutations and experimentations able to generate different objects.

A poetical and ethical-oriented creation that suggests us a new point of view from which looking at the contemporary sustainability matter.

SAVING/SPACE/VASE Design by JVLT/JoeVelluto

Are you a bottle or a vase? In a sarcastic exchange of roles, Saving Space Vase undertook a pressure process as it comes out of the mould.

The original object, the vase, acquires a new connotation enriched with a different aesthetic and an extraneous meaning. A process that winks at our daily gestures, familiar as the one of pressing a PET bottle… preparing it at the second step of its existence, the recycling

See all our stories from Milan in our special Milan 09 category.

| 18 comments

Posted on Thursday, March 26th, 2009 at 3:22 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • http://www.yatzer.com ZUY: itaian dutch design?

    if i seee the photo , is new italian design a differential design from dutch design?I dunnot know the result of the study by Future design lab about new italian design identity….Does any know Morace works there?

  • http://www.diisign.com diisign

    Interesting, but for an industrial reality, this form can be moulded… There is no added value with this process apart from making unique pieces.

  • max von shnitzel

    ^^^ agreed w/ above. would be MORE interesting if diff weights were used to crush an assortment of vases. 1 ton, 2 ton, 4 ton, etc

  • b

    the words make it a bit pretentious,..the shape is not to exciting but …..quite an interesting spin on a technique (rotomolding) that hardly ever produces anything very interesting..if I see correctly the actual mould is even used to crush the thing…..maybe its a first step..lets hope so..

  • http://whspr.me/Ps ZUY: italian dutch design?

    why not if you see the Rosenthal broken vase by DrorBenchetrit

  • http://whspr.me/Ps ZUY: italian dutch design?

    … benchetrit is from israel works in NYC but studied in Eindhoven
    http://www.lexpress.fr/medias/207/fragile-7_263.jpg

  • Japr

    “A poetical and ethical-oriented creation that suggests us a new point of view from which looking at the contemporary sustainability matter”………”pressing a PET bottle… preparing it at the second step of its existence, the recycling”.
    is this vase paving its own way to the end of its life cycle? why saying such compromising words? anyway it’s nicer than other vases, but it could even look nicer if not being associated to sustainability and recycling.

  • joris moonen

    when i was 18 i spent two weeks in italy on a school holiday visiting the ancient sites in Rome etc. one day i crushed a can of coke and kept it, putting it on the side table in my hotel room, as a valuable piece of art. the next morning i found the cleaning lady wanting to throw away my crushed can. i didn’t understand how she could be so ignorant wanting to destroy this prototype that would inspire so many contemporary artists. today i still keep it in my closet, waiting for the economy to kick in again and selling it for big money.
    (that day i wanted to make it into the headquarters of some anti-globalisation organisation btw)

  • b

    well zuy, if you are going to talk about that vase
    tjep did it a few years earlier
    http://www.designaddict.com/img/pictures/object976_pic1880_normal.jpg
    but hey this is a different technique..works for me
    as I said the words are a bit pretentious.
    but I think it is fun that rotomoulding can finaly give some identity to its material…

  • http://clonic.ru Clonic

    Individualization :)

  • http://whspr.me/Ps ZUY: broken vases

    thank b for the link

  • http://whspr.me/Ps ZUY: thin top?

    Clonic i’m not sure it’s individualization it’s deformation

  • Widi

    And how does it stand on a bent base??
    Please deliberate your design and don’t make decisions in the packaging -hall befor delivering.

  • mikaël

    widi, was asking myself the same question, you can see on the close up the base is clearly warped, yet nothing says they have addressed this problem

  • claude.mallia

    anyone seen the ‘crinkled cups’?
    http://www.martiniboys.com/Toronto/products/1357

  • http://whspr.me/Ps ZUY: cup

    the ‘crinkled cups’ is a best seller

  • http://www.asdfghjkl.com asdfghjkl

    I don’t think there’s any point in discussing ‘who got there first’ for an idea that everybody once scribbled in their sketchbook.

  • http://whspr.me/Ps Prof. Z