Crate Cabinets by Pieke Bergmans

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Milan 09: Dutch designer Pieke Bergmans launched a range of cabinets comprising antique items of furniture mounted inside rough wooden crates.

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Crate Cabinets, shown in Zona Tortona in Milan last month, are based on the methods normally used to transport precious artworks.

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The following is from Pieke Bergmans:

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Crate Cabinets

‘handle with care’

A collection of cabinets designed by Pieke Bergmans

How do we look after our most precious belongings? Six months ago, Pieke Bergmans asked this question when she needed to transport her work to the other side of the world. At that moment in time she didn’t realize that it was the start of a fascination.

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When precious objects are shipped across the world, Vermeers to Chicago, terracotta from Beijing or bulbs to Miami they are transported in museum crates. These crates are made to measure to ensure the maximum protection of their precious cargo. It’s not surprising that they are called museum crates, in protecting the most amazing artifacts known to man. Crates are built to be strong and robust for the ensuing journey, providing comfort to its contents, making sure that everything arrives in one piece.

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The crate is an icon for safety and protection. We all relate to its function, able to read on the markings its origin, destination and the fragility of its content.

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The crate creates a sense of curiosity. What makes a crates content so special that it needs to be packed so precise and to be sent across the globe? This curiosity and sense of expectation was the inspiration for Pieke Bergmans to design a collection of cabinets. Their external raw functionality hiding their fragile internal contents only experienced once the crate doors open.

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Series of cabinets:
Edition: 4 unique pieces
Dimensions: 80 x 40 x 60 - 200 x 60 x 230
Material: wooden museum crates and antique furniture

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More Dezeen stories about Pieke Bergmans:

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For Al Sabah Art & Design Collection

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Mirror Virus (Milan 2007)

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Vitra Virus (Milan 2007)

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Light Blubs (Milan 2008)

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Melted Collection (Milan 2008)

  • münte

    uuuuuuh, please let the closets be closed :)

    in germany we would say: aussen hui, innen pfui!

  • http://www.asdfghjkl.com asdfghjkl

    Didn’t Jurgen Bey do this project a few years back?

    http://futureblog.designhotels.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/_burningman__blog.jpg

    ahh crates again….

  • B

    didn’t jurgen bey already put cabinets and other furniture in crates and boxes?

  • Kathleen

    And for the antiques: ventilation, humidity and temperature control?
    Or is it fungus & deterioration for the sake of art?

  • Kris Adams

    If this is part of a ‘research’ MA then maybe, just maybe it can be justified. I personally love the fact that anyone can get so wrapped up in one idea to take it to its very conclusion and this is it, something which only a museum would purchase and encase it in the same packaging as a result. Clever!

    Therefore if the museum did indeed purchase such an item, the “fragile internal contents only experienced once the crate doors open” element would sadly be lost.