72 Rivington Street by The Klassnik Corporation

| 6 comments

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London-based design practice The Klassnik Corporation have designed the interior of creative agency YCN's new home, located in a former warehouse in Shoreditch, London.

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The multi-purpose venue comprises a public ground floor, two floors of studio space and a rooftop.

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Work by emerging designers, illustrators and artists is exhibited in the ground floor space, open daily to the public.

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Publications, products, artwork and furniture are available to buy in the YCN shop.

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A lending library has also been incorporated into the space.

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For the ground level, mobile display units have been designed to be easily reconfigured to suit the changing requirements of the space.

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The "kit of parts" include plinths, vitrines, shelves, walls, and steps.

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The project was built and installed in collaboration with OKAY Studio and Rob Thuring.

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A graphic identity for the venue has also been created by Eat Sleep Work /Play.

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Further information from YCN below:

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YCN open public space to showcase new creative talent

72 Rivington Street is the new physical home of YCN — a multi-purpose work space comprising a public ground floor, two floors of studio and a rooftop; located in a former warehouse in Shoreditch.

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The ground floor space is now open daily and exhibits the work of new designers, illustrators and other emerging creative practitioners.

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A collection of items are available to buy including publications, artwork, furniture and other new products. A lending library is also incorporated, and free to join.

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The two upper floors of the building provide studio space for the YCN team and the different freelance creatives and collaborators working on YCN projects.

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YCN Director Nick Defty comments “Since forming YCN in 2001 we've worked hard to develop platforms online and in print to showcase emerging talent. It's very exciting to now also have a physical space in a great central location to invite the public into.”

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The interiors have been designed for YCN by The Klassnik Corporation. At ground level irregularly shaped mobile display objects provide a kit of parts including plinths, vitrines, shelves, walls, and steps that can be easily reconfigured to suit different uses.

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Tomas Klassnik comments, “Responding to the way YCN operates, the interior of 72 Rivington Street is designed to enable creativity by providing a functional environment adaptable to the needs of its users”. Klassnik collaborated with OKAY Studio and Rob Thuring who manufactured and installed the project.

Taking its cue from the shape and markings of the building; a graphic identity for 72 Rivington Street has been created by Eat Sleep Work /Play.  A dedicated website for the building has been produced in-house by YCN, and can be seen at www.72rivingtonstreet.com

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The ground floor is open from 10am to 6pm daily.

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About YCN

Formed in 2001, YCN create projects and platforms to showcase emerging talent in design and communication. These include award programmes, publishing ventures and constant collaborations. A unique agency sits as part of YCN; representing new talent for commission and producing design, campaigns and other communication for varied clients in all media. Recent clients include the University of the Arts London, ActionAid, Universal Music and Beck's.

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About The Klassnik Corporation

The Klassnik Corporation is a London based interdisciplinary design practice focused on architectural research. Recent projects have focused on proposals for a super heated London in 2035, the future evolution of UK universities, exhibition design for the Royal College of Art and the creation of children’s learning activity packs for the Design Museum.

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  • David Klemmer

    Looks “cool” and “funny”. But there is no need for doing this. It’s expensive, its less useful and it doesn’t look quite good to me, except the rolling showcase. The shapes are all quite confusing and sometimes out of place. It’s funny for the first time you see it and basically it is OK for this kind of agency, but for me it is just a try to bring up graphic illustrations and shapes into interior-design, which does not work that good in this case. Well built anyway.

  • andrew griffin

    Nice work TK!

  • modular

    Why not?

  • walter w.

    is there a toilet on wheels too?

  • Jacques Herzog

    i would give this guy a job, for sure.

  • noviardi prasetya

    Yeah, Why not ?!

    @DK: sometimes u don’t have to be very functional and useful.. try to enjoy the ‘design’ and try to design for fun =)