Sling Back by Quirky

| 6 comments

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A cable-tidying device called Sling Back (above) is the first product to be launched by Quirky, an new web-based service where product ideas submitted by designers are selected and developed by an online social community.

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The Quirky community select one product per week from submitted ideas to take forward for development and eventually be sold in the online shop.

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For the products that make it into production, thirty cents of each dollar made through their sale goes back to the collaborators involved in realising the product.

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It costs $99 dollars to submit an idea. Where submissions are not taken forward for development, the originator receives the market research data obtained during the selection process.

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Upcoming products are sold at a discount to guarantee enough sales are made before the product goes into full production. Quirky is the brainchild of American designer and entrepreneur Ben Kaufman.

| 6 comments

Posted on Tuesday, June 16th, 2009 at 1:28 pm by Brad Turner. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • Teapodd

    Better to not sing in, so others would have bigger chance to not lose their money :)

    Another question who would make those designs – qualification?

    And its better to make small factory somewhere in not developed area, co realisation would be cheaper :)

  • Tyler

    This reminds me of iMacs, circa late 90′s. Love the idea of the website, but this particular project is a little stale.

  • toodles

    just can’t see this working out.

    toodles

  • cantileverer

    upon reading through the website of this venture and looking at this product in particular. i would be very wary of investing 99 dollari. a little bit flakey

  • cd

    totally…how bout this – we submit ideas, then, IF you use my idea you can pay me for it.

  • http://www.asdfghjkl.com asdfghjkl

    I’m not sure that this is more attractive than just seeing a cable itself…

    Would we next need a large shiny containing device to hide the stack of large shiny containing devices?