Competition: five copies of Super Contemporary
catalogue to be won

| 2 comments

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Dezeen have teamed up with the Design Museum in London to give readers the chance to win one of five copies of the exhibition catalogue for Super Contemporary, currently on show at the museum.

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The book looks at four decades of creativity in London through the political, cultural and economic climate of the city. Dezeen's launch in November 2006 is included in the exhibition's timeline.

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The catalogue includes specially-commissioned works for the exhibition including London-based designers including Paul Smith, Zaha HadidRon Arad, Tom Dixon and David Adjaye.

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Dezeen was commissioned to make a series of movie interviews with London designers for display in the exhibition. Watch some of them on Dezeen here:

Tom Dixon
Hussein Chalayan
Neville Brody

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This competition is now closed.

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Subscribe to our newsletter, get our RSS feed or follow us on Twitter for details of future competitions.

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More details about the exhibition and commissions in our previous story. The exhibition continues until 4 October.

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Here's some text about the book from the Design Museum:

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Design Museum has joined forces with Beefeater 24 to celebrate the fearlessly progressive spirit of London's greatest creative minds, past and present. London thinks, designs and makes like no other city; it creates and the world follows. A magnet for mavericks and freethinkers, London has nurtured a creative community that continues to rival all other design capitals.

These creative networks have spurred each other on. This exhibition will illustrate London's pursuit of new, better and braver, across architecture, industrial design, graphics, fashion and communications alike. Endlessly pushing at the forefront of design and constantly inventing for new worlds, London's design output is continually Super Contemporary.

At the heart of the exhibition are fifteen commissions from some of London's most dynamic creatives, as a group they demonstrate the diverse approaches to design in London:

Bus Shelter by David Adjaye. Gone with the Wind by Ron Arad. Listening Station by BarberOsgerby. Freedom Space by Neville Brody. Batterseum by Nigel Coates. Rain It In by Paul Cocksedge. London Transport by Tom Dixon. Horatio’s Garden by El Ultimo Grito with Urban Salon. Thames Pin by Kit Grover. Vision for the city of London by Zaha Hadid. K9 Post Office Kiosk by Industrial Facility. Lamp Post Chandelier by Thomas Heatherwick. KiosKiosk by Wayne Hemingway. Head to Toe by Ross Phillips. New London Rubbish Bin by Paul Smith.

The spirit of London design; past, present and future; is explored here in this beautifully designed and presented catalogue. The first part of the book examines, through full colour images and text, the last four decades of design in London, with creativity set against the political, cultural and economic climate. This leads up to now, and the notion of a super contemporary city. What's next? What do we need? What should London designers give back to the city that provided the opportunity, inspiration and platform for their ideas?

We then move into the exhibition itself, and the discover the specifically commissioned works from an array London based designers including Paul Smith, Thomas Heatherwick, Ron Arad, BarberOsgerby, Neville Brody, Ross Philips, Wayne Hemingway, Tom Dixon, Paul Cocksedge, Zaha Hadid, El Ultimo Grito, Kit Grover, Industrial Facility, Large Blue, Nigel Coates and David Adjaye.

Congratulations to the winners! Thomas Beresford in the USA, Heloisa Righetto in the UK, Lukasz Chmiel in Poland, Paolo Migliori in Italy and Matt Shaw in the USA all win copies of the Super Contemporary exhibition catalogue.

  • http://www.muuuz.com Prof. Z.

    great job

  • Jerrold

    this representation of the contemporary is a sad reflection on the state of what should be creative thinking and innovative work