DURAS Daiba by Chikara Ohno

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Designer Chikara Ohno of Sinato has completed the interior of a boutique in Tokyo by adding a display level above head height made of expanded metal.

Called DURAS Daiba, the shop has a stepped platform in the centre allowing shoppers to reach the merchandise spread out on the mesh surface.

Mirrors round the edge of the upper space visually expand the shop.

Photographs are by Takumi Ota.

Here's some more information from the architects:


DURAS Daiba

At first, we have to think how to make use of the 3.65m high-ceiling for this interior space. In a huge shopping floor, actually we often witness that such the rest space of the high-ceiling is just void for only looking at wall finish, because the most of the action for buying and selling is centered close to human body. To partition this space horizontally, we installed alternative ceiling made by expand-metal panel at 2.25m high and set up several steps which enable us to get up above an attic space and to spent higher space for shopping, not for only looking.

Two mounds as like stepped “stacking slabs” diagonally in this premise are useful stage for displaying bags, heels and mannequins and give us the planning choice which the long way, going at floor level or the shortcut, going up some steps.
On the top of the hill, to open up the field of vision absolutely like a sea of clouds, the finish of surrounding walls over 2.25m high changes from paint to mirror that reflects expand-metal horizon and lighting bulbs many times. We expect this illusionary attic space as gimmick to prevent to boar the huge floor shopping.

[designer] Chikara Ohno / sinato
[design office] sinato
[location] 1-3-15-3F Aomi Koto-ku Tokyo 135-0064 Japan
[client] DURAS Inc.
[date of completion] 12 / 2009
[use] shop
[area] 126.76m2
[photographer] Takumi Ota


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  • felix

    I like that clothes can be hung from the mesh.

    They really need a couple more images showing how customers and sales assistants use the platforms together. It could be quite tricky to properly serve a customer up there, and if they can’t use the steps do you have to go and get all the product and take it to them?

    That said, it’s clearly something different and that means a lot.

  • waus

    simple,intelligent and elegant..
    bravo Sinato

  • http://florianveltman.blogspot.com/ Florian

    Very elegant. I don’t really see how the stairs can be problematic, but I really like the idea of going upstairs to these sort of isles surrounded by light and mirrors. I like the use of concrete blocks, too.