Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

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Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Japanese designer Masato Sekiya elevated this house so that it would fit over the humped site in Ashiya, Japan.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Called Lifted House, the residence is framed by woods and has a view of the ocean in the distance from the upper storey.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

More about Masato Sekiya on Dezeen:

A Mono Struct House by Masato Sekiya (June 2010)
House for Three Children by Masato Sekiya (June 2010)

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Photographs are by Akira Kita.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Here's a little more information from Masato Sekiya:


Location is On the northen side of the hills surrounding Ashiya city in Hyogo Prefecture.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

The piece of land is 900m sq and humped like a house's back.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

It faces south and on its north side is woods so landscaping and the building's setting in its enviroment were prime considerations.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

In deciding floor height, I designed the kitchen with a view of the ocean in distance, and calculated the storey below accordingly.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Click above for larger image

By lifting most of the upstairs, it was not necessary to alter the contours of the land.

Lifted House by Masato Sekiya

Click above for larger image


See also:

A Mono Struct House
by Masato Sekiya
House for Three Children by Masato Sekiya Torreagüera Vivienda
Atresada by Xpiral
  • edward

    Thats a lot of house for one small bedroom. And so far away from the bathroom!

  • yeahhhhh

    i love the room labelled 'japanese style room….'

    • nooooooo

      this is actually very common in Japan, to have "Japanese style room" in a "western style house" – or vice versa. It will be a tatami room. A "western style room" would normally be carpeted and have brick effect wallpaper.

  • odile dimittri dupontc

    unless bathrooms in japan are used to wash the vegetables I would like to read about the reasons behind its strange (mis)placement.

  • Felix

    how can someone make such a clean and rational looking exterior design such a daft plan?

  • RLKC

    the placement of the bathroom is indeed very very strange.

    • nooooooo

      Again, this is very common in Japan.
      It is not only the architect who works on layout.
      Maybe you should tell the client where they should have their bathroom.

  • Phil

    The retaining wall in the garage is the only decent thing this project has going for it… it goes downhill from there.

    Most architect would rather keep quiet results like this.

  • angry catalan

    Probably Mr Sekiya's team didn't know what to do or had some sort of problem with the water pipes, so they put the bathroom next to the kitchen. I'm surprised Japanese building regulations allow this (usually they won't let you build a house like this for hygienic reasons), but otherwise I don't really think it's a big deal, and if you look at vernacular city housing in Europe, you'll see it's not too uncommon, however unconvenient and antihygienic (I won't deny!)

  • H8daGame

    Please, by all means, refrain from saying anything positive about anything, ever.

  • http://twitter.com/archimales @archimales

    Nice Lightscape !