PUMA Mopion Bike by KiBiSi and Biomega

| 11 comments

PUMA Mopion Bike by KiBiSi

Danish bicycle company Biomega and design collective KiBiSi have collaborated to create this new bike for sports brand Puma.

PUMA Mopion Bike by KiBiSi

The PUMA Mopion Bike has a metal rack attached to the front of the frame for carrying baggage.

PUMA Mopion Bike by KiBiSi

The frame is made of aluminium, weighs 22 kilograms and comes in black, white, or a magenta, blue and lime livery.

PUMA Mopion Bike by KiBiSi

See more bikes by Biomega for Puma in our earlier story.

Here some more from the designers:


The PUMA Mopion Bike

A Sturdy Companion

PUMA Mopion is rock steady for the daily grind. It mixes city bike features, and cargo bike features, making it a sturdy companion. It comes with a super-size innovative front carrier for heavy duty transport of your groceries or other needs. Developed for city dwellers, Mopion features a light aluminum frame, making it a one-of-a-kind lightweight cargo bike weighing only 22 kilos. The geometry holds the body in a slightly inclined, but still heads-up position for navigational ease and exceptional balancing.

The name Mopion derives from an island in the Atlantic Ocean, symbolizing the new Trans-Atlantic approach and balancing PUMA’s European heritage with American popular culture. Mopion will be available in white, black and in the bold color combination magenta/blue/lime. The colors are likewise inspired by vibrant island colors. Mopion defies the expected.

The PUMA Bike Line
Created for ease of movement, urban transportation, and individual appeal, PUMA and the Biomega design team have collaborated to produce the next evolution in commuter bikes. Smart European design and commuter technology collide with urban American style – and culminate in a completely new Trans-Atlantic bike paradigm. PUMA pared down its bikes to their essentials and constructed a new bike line with innovative and thoughtful details that meet the needs of a unique consumer set. The PUMA Bike line is designed for urban mobility and finds innovative solutions for the everyday annoyances that come from maneuvering bikes through urban obstacles. The collection redefines and reinvigorates the city ride.

By pulling together the best parts of practical, continental city and folding bikes, BMXs, American cruisers, and fixies, these PUMA Bikes create a whole new urban typology, one that stands out in the crowd and knows how to make its own way.

Mopion will be launched at the Eurobike and Interbike shows in September 2010, and will be available from spring 2011.


See also:

.

LDN by Ross Lovegrove
and NYC by KiBiSi
2010 Puma Bikes
by Biomega
Dezeen’s
top ten: bikes
  • http://twitter.com/photolifeofq @photolifeofq

    just amazing…maybe a little bit hard to steer but great design

  • http://studio-lmnoq.blogspot.com/ Laz

    I agree. I can't wait to try it out in person.

  • pasty

    @ @photolifeofq,

    How is it a good design if it is likely to be hard to steer? Surely one of the most basic requirements of a bike is to be able to steer with ease!?

  • http://www.jagharenkamera.blogspot.com/ Konrad

    looks very funky

  • Goose

    I really don't see the point. It looks impossible to steer, extremely long, heavy and ugly. Exscuse the pun but why re in vent the wheel.

  • papa

    A bit hard to steer? Unfunctional design can't be good or "great" design.

  • Chris

    I think that a general flaw with Biomega, KiBiSi and many other design companies are that none of them give any thoughts to the product in the use phase. Adding a bit of actual userinteraction and research instead of pure "desk design" would increase the value of many products drastically.

  • logorithm

    Hmmm… why are people commenting that it is hard to steer? Have you guys actually tested it?

    It does look like a cargo bike. Only nicer. ;-)

  • bcndc

    I don't really understand why the bike needs to be extra-long for the baggage rack when it seems that the rack could fit in the space in front of the pedals or, better, behind the seat. It does not seem to hold any more goods than a typical carrier, so, I don't see where the extra size is justified.

  • max

    who says it will be difficult to steer?

  • Frits B

    I might add that this bike is obviously aimed at men whereas in NL mostly women ride them. So instep is too high and from a woman's point of view the rack is far too open; it needs a basket or crate to keep its contents together, thus spoiling the whole effect. Furthermore: a derailer gear system, no lights, no rear rack, no mud guards, no chain guard? All in the interest of design?