Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

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Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Japanese architects Shinichi Ogawa & Associates have completed this house in Hiroshima, Japan, with one wall glazed in sliding panels that open onto a grassy courtyard.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Called Warehouse, the long narrow space has an open-plan interior.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

A free-standing structure in the double-height space houses cabinets and private rooms, while the top of the largest unit can be used as an extra floor.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

At night, light from the inside can be seen from the street through a frosted glass courtyard wall.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

Photographs are by the architects unless stated otherwise.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

Here's more detail from the architects:


The house is essentially a large, “one room space” with functional furniture (millwork).

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

This site is located in the suburb, Higashihiroshima-shi in Hiroshima, Japan. There are low-rise houses vastly spread around this rural district.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

The building is a single volume house with dimensions of 3.0m H. x 8.0m W. x 21.5m L. with a courtyard enclosed by frosted glass.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

The interior of this “one room space” is composed of a hall, living/dining room and a kitchen, bathroom, Japanese-style room, study room, and a master bedroom, which are all laid out in a linear arrangement.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

This “one room space” is compartmentalized into several spaces by the floor level changes and the arrangement of functional furniture.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

The top of the functional furniture creates yet another floor, which is planned to be the child room, while the inside of this functional furniture is planned for private space.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Hence, while being able to feel and be part of this vast, “one room space”, simultaneously, one is able to have privacy, by aligning the top of the functional furniture to the same height.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

The interior space seamlessly connects with the courtyard on the south side of the house, due to the sliding glass doors which can fully open and let the interior become one with nature.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

This house enables a comfortable, luxurious space where the residents' daily actions are accomplished and where one can live along with the change of nature.

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Above photograph is by Yoshiyuki Yano

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa AssociatesWarehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates

Warehouse by Shinichi Ogawa Associates


See also:

.

Cube House by
Shinichi Ogawa & Associates
House DE by
Davidclovers
Zafra-Uceda by
NO.MAD Arquitectos
  • http://www.roeldevos.com roel

    how difficult can it be! this shows how beautiful simpicity is. real architecture.

  • D.Kang

    so, why it's titled as 'warehouse'?

  • http://www.tzero.eu Tzero

    Clear, simple and convenient.
    good work

  • edward

    For persons who can't stand clutter. And I can't stand bugs in the house. Otherwise super clean design.

  • http://www.thisistomorrow.info james

    nothing short of exquisite

  • eMPi

    Acoustic privacy?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000484007310 Johann Koenitz

    Love it. Very Contemporary. I like the room-in-room concept.

  • Lewis Mitchell

    The singular door on a bare wall to enter the building must be Shinichi Ogawa & Associates trademark, quite the minimalist statement, which works really well as an introduction to the interior.

    I'd love to know if the owners actually live this minimalist lifestyle to the extreme and hide away everything they use after they have finished with it.

  • Louie

    Having a kid's room and no acoustic privacy. I appreciate the beauty in the simple wholesomeness of it all, but I wouldn't live in it.

  • Tom Ford

    Hands up who's bored with the austere white on white Japanese aesthetic?

  • Eldon

    Beautiful.
    Question: How is the structure over the sliding doors supported? The span is huge.

  • teefs

    I imagine the structure over the sliding doors will be a (steel) truss beam.
    Japanese people obviously never have sex – kids room overlooking the master bedroom with no walls or anything between . . . they must not have mosquitoes either. I wonder how the toilet ventilates, there don't seem to be any ducts coming out of the volume. It's still gorgeous though, nice big spaces, very photogenic.

  • http://www.brgstudio.com nulla

    Minimalism design pushed to its extremes,still they managed to do an excellent job.

  • mcmlxix

    Excellent concept, but I'm not sure I'm on board with the execution…and poor Mies…his beautiful chair is everywhere. When will Ikea cheapen it further?