Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

| 9 comments

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

David Mikhail Architects won the New London Architecture's Don't Move, Improve! competition with this project extending a London terraced house by just one metre.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Called Hoxton House, the project involved reconfiguring the interior and connecting it to the small courtyard garden through the addition of a glazed facade with timber frame.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Part of the living room floor was removed at the rear of the house to create a double-height kitchen and dining area in the basement.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

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Here are some more details from David Mikhail Architects:


An extension of only one metre combined with a reworking of the interior, has transformed this Victorian house. A two-storey cruciform façade is engineered from timber (Douglas fir) and structurally bonded double-glazing.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

A white kitchen and concrete floor are offset with natural materials and warm brick hues in the small courtyard.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Like our ‘Square House’ in Camden, this property had a multitude of small rooms, and the architectural organisation is very similar, only on a smaller scale. A tiny kitchen sat underground in the semi basement, with a head height of only 2m.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Above: front of the property

The garden was accessed from the half landing of a cramped servants staircase.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Above: rear of the property before project began

Aims

Whilst modest in scale, we wanted to give the house a grander architectural order to complement the existing rooms. The clients are a young couple and they wanted a great place for eating or watching each other cook or chat. They felt it essential that the new room should be connected to the garden, even though it is small.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Strategies

By taking away fabric as well as adding it, we have been able to carve out a set of new relationships. The house was extended to the rear by only one metre so as not to encroach too much on the rear garden, or to affect the neighbours. Even so, in such a small property this single move has revealed a new potential for how the house and its courtyard garden are experienced.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

We also removed part of the upper ground floor in two places; firstly to give access for a new stair at the front of the house, and secondly at the rear to give height to the basement. This provides a generous double height dining area and kitchen that connects directly to the garden. The vistas and drama that unfold within this small house, as you walk in directly off the street in Hoxton are a complete surprise.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects

Material

A two-storey cruciform façade is engineered from timber (Douglas fir) and structurally bonded double-glazing. A white kitchen and concrete floor are offset with natural materials and warm brick hues in the small courtyard, which was also refashioned by the architects.

Hoxton House by David Mikhail Architects


See also:

.

Extension by Anne Menke
and Winkens Architekten
Extension by
Ailtireacht Architects
Extension by
Neostudio Architekci
| 9 comments

Posted on Saturday, January 15th, 2011 at 11:51 am by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • Yael

    Loved it
    Used a small but with amazing skill the one meter extension
    Love the space light and the all around feeling of "grand"!!!!!

  • teefs

    Fantastic use of the available space. So much more than the sum of its parts. It really really works.

  • http://www.brgstudio.com nulla

    Size does not matter, you can see when a project is really good, as it happens here.

  • http://www.twitter.com/architectum Architectum

    Really amazing what you can do with so little space! I like it that it reveals its modernity only on the backside… Do you know anything about the costs?

  • e1027

    ground floor becomes mezzanine – nice idea, and sweetly done – ground to 1st floor stairs cool too – though you don't really need the famous 1m extension for this idea work i suppose

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001857394783 Thomas Washington

    What a creative solution to expanding a historic row house. I love the concept “don’t move, improve” of the competition. It is truly sustainable to adapt existing structures rather than always building new.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=564361351 Thi Nguyen

      I agree! Great use of available light as well.

  • http://www.saimanmiah.com Saiman

    Bravo! Absolutely awesome project. Lots to be learned here.

  • Nadia

    Beautiful! And very well thought through.