Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

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Here's a house in Osaka, Japan, by Yoshihara McKee Architects of New York and Tokyo.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Called Minamikawa House, the residence has a sloping lawn that rises from street level to meet the living areas, which are suspended over walkways beneath either side of the house.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Rooms on the lower floor are organised in wooden, glass and concrete volumes, while the upper floor that contains bedrooms and bathrooms is more enclosed.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

"The site is relatively bigger than many of the Japanese projects featured recently, and it afforded us the opportunity to play with landscape, changes in level, and a generally more intricate series of design moves," says Marcello Pacheco of Yoshihara McKee Architects.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

See also: Posen Loft by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

More Japanese houses on Dezeen »

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Here are some more details from the architects:


Although designed to harmonize comfortably with the other residences in this typical suburban landscape, the Minamigawa house is a departure from traditional Japanese home design.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Unlike its neighbors each of which presents a bland façade to the street with a formally defined house and garden hidden behind it this home merges indoor and outdoor spaces into a unified whole.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

The garden climbs up from street level, penetrating the built form and pulling the eye beyond the structure's surface to a planted terrace overlooking the street.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

At the top of the incline, the primary living spaces within the open concrete and glass frame take advantage of the views to the garden and an adjacent park, while wood-clad boxes offer domestic warmth and privacy.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Flowing back and forth between house and garden, the design blurs the distinction between what is "inside" and what is "outside."

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

The third floor, with more enclosed rooms well above eye and street level, offers added privacy.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Throughout, a palette of simple building materials enhances the unconventional design, while the balanced scale of all the elements contributes a quiet informality.

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects

Minamikawa House by Yoshihara McKee Architects


See also:

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  • yuc

    Interiors is about one thing: relaxation. This is possibly because the design was not forced to be very innovative (so that is not bad at all). Such a Zen kitchen. Yes, the design is very modernist , and yet, we find Smithsons' "New Brutalism" at the bathroom reminiscent of their famous Huntington School.

  • ferdie_bonaparte

    Did I just see through the toilet bowl from the street?

    • andy

      Weird, huh? From inside it looks like sanded or frosted glass. From the street, it's clearly translucent.

  • testify

    very nice! love the section..

  • http://www.builtfabricblog.blogspot.com Rube

    Its great to see a contemporary building which appreciates the context and deals with it so well particularly in terms of tone and texture.

  • http://anziulewicz.livejournal.com Chuck Anziulewicz

    Looks more like an office than a home, especially from the outside … but YEAH, I could live there.

  • Garch

    It's a very nice section and good play on the levels of landscaping. I'm not sure about the upper facade material choice, but overall, the composition is very well-done, you really get it in the night shot.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bauxetio Piero Teardo

    Nice interiors, not really exciting exterior, not the best choice of materials in general, in my opinion. But, boy isn't it always nice to let people from the street watch you while you poo!

  • Matilde

    Although not a fan of contemporary architecture, I loved this design. It appears light and airy. The bathroom and the kitchen were spacious, very functional and beautiful. The modern design was timeless and not trendy or outrageous. I would love to live there.

  • edward

    At this scale, the design moves away from the spiritualism of the smaller examples, and lacking the rigor of Tadao Andio, veers toward the commercial/academic. Spatially interesting, the materials have become oppressive.

  • glenn

    It's a very interesting design. This home is so modern, that it may be the look of the future! I love how it's organized.

  • David

    Strong similarities to OMA's Villa Dall'ava.

    • Smack

      I was thinking exactly the same..the elevation is virtually a carbon copy

  • jojo

    the concrete ceiling in the kitchen, they've done something to it . . .it's warm? why not more creativity with the expanses of concrete?

  • James

    Absolutely magnificent!

    True example of contemporary architecture; I can honestly say that I fell in love at first sight, and that was just the first picture.

    The whole concept of the surroundings of the house "elevated" to meet the "floating" house I find, is the most extraordinary portion of this work, alongside the ability to make concrete meet wood with such contrast, yet still attaining such a harmonious gesture of elegance.

    Great job on keeping the indoor/outdoor "flow"; very refreshing.
    Sign me up, I would gladly live there and have NO problems with using the toilet that is being visible from the outside!!!

    JJL