V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

| 11 comments

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Here's the next house in the series of eleven by Rotterdam studio Pasel Kuenzel Architects on the site of a former slaughterhouse in Leiden, Netherlands.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Named V12K0102, the house and its neighbours form part of an area masterplan by Dutch architects MVRDV.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

The 30 metre-long building alternates between one and two storeys-high and is clad in a chequered pattern of timber and white render.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

The house also features long narrow windows and a camouflaged front door.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

A private courtyard splits the house into two halves, one occupied by the children and the other used by the parents.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

This courtyard can be surveyed from a first floor deck, which also overlooks a second smaller courtyard on the opposite side of the building.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

We've previously featured four houses from this series on Dezeen - see the projects here and see all our stories about Dutch houses here, including one with perforated fabric tacked onto its facades.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Photography is by Marcel van der Burg.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Here are a few additional words from Pasel Kuenzel Architects:


V12K0102 - 30 running meters of house!

On the site of a former slaughterhouse in the historical heart of the Dutch university city of Leiden, emerges one of the biggest urban developments of private dwellings in the Netherlands.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

In their series of eleven, Rotterdam based architects pasel.künzel architects present yet another spectecular house giving a new interpretation of the classical Dutch housing typology.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

With their V12K0102 residence pasel.kuenzel architects created a remarkable project on an almost triangular building plot, the remnant of an inner city housing block.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

On a 30 metre long one-storey high base, two building volumes were placed on opposite side, one being the ‘children’s house’ and the other serving as the ‘house of the parents’.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

The two parts facing each other allow for visible eye contact, but are furthermore physically separeted.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Collective spaces for living, dining and playing are situated on the ground floor, meandering around two intimate courtyards and establishing an immediate relation between ‘life inside and outside’ – an oasis in the city.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

Towards the city, the introvert house reveals his inner life by only two gigantic glass panes that also permit the characteristic Dutch light to reach deep into the museum like spaces.

V12K0102 by Pasel Kuenzel Architects

  • edward

    "museum like spaces." I knew there was something that bothered me. The long window along the sidewalk suggest a commercial display. Why not power coat the aluminum work say yellow.. Admirably rigorous, but for children…?

  • H-J

    They single-handedly put Leiden on the map of modern-architecture-to-see in the Netherlands.

  • BOB

    Striking trousers.

  • amisal

    nice building but inside its too empty

  • David

    Beautiful detailing

  • good work

    Great stuff! This level of detailing and refinement is hard to achieve in the Netherlands. As a kid (and a parent) I'd love to have my own 'house within a house'. @amisal: It looks like the occupants haven't moved in yet, I doubt it'll stay so empty for long.

    • H-J

      I believe the guy on the photo is either Pasel or Künzel, so you're right about the occupants not having moved in yet.

      • Yep…

        …it's Pasel.

  • Skaap

    Hospital or house? Some architects just can't do houses with soul

  • james wong

    nice color, maybe change of color in the next few more months will change

  • Cubasur

    Whats permissible ground coverage in Leiden. 100 percent?!