Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

| 7 comments

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Japanese architects Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates have completed a four-winged house in Toyota.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The metal facade of the Oshikamo house conceals a timber interior and two sheltered courtyards.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Skylights between exposed rafters let natural light into an open-plan living room at the centre of the house.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Ladders climb up into loft bedrooms in two of the wings, above a third bedroom and a large walk-in closet.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The third remaining wing contains washrooms, while a space used for quiet contemplation occupies the fourth.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

This is the third house by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates featured on Dezeen - see our earlier stories about one with rooms in separate blocks and another shaped like a triangle.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Photography is by Toshiyuki Yano.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Here's a little more text from Katsutoshi Sasaki:


Oshikamo

Prerequisite

The lot is located in a residential area and is surrounded by neighboring housings, with a mother's house on its west.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Requests for the house include: encourages the family to spend time together (rather than isolating anyone) / spatial / bright with plenty of natural light.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Plot

The family space is arranged at the center of the site.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The private space is arranged at the edge of the site, and they connect gradually by the one volume.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Distance among rooms and curved spaces provide adequate privacy.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Each rooms are indistinctly connected to each other via central space.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Indistinct

That indistinct connection is the key concept of this house, expressing the spatial relationship (not on/off relationship) among the rooms. Like a photo out of focus.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Invisible one room

You can grasp the space visually if the entire space is visible.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

You can let your consciousness develop the space if not all is visible. Like walking in a path, not sure of what is ahead.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Click above for larger image

Ambiguously

Spaces divided by straight lines relate to rationally. Spaces connected with curving lines relate to ambiguously. 
Like a drop of milk in coffee.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Click above for larger image

Connection

What interests us is how rooms connect to each other, more than how a room is made.
What interests us is the “air” that curves, crosses, and diffracts. Like a cloud, constantly moving without having definite shape.

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Location: Toyota Aichi Japan
Site Area: 191.71m2
Built Area: 84.18m2
Total Floor Area: 101.94m2

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Click above for larger image

Type of Construction: Wooden
Exterior Materials: Metal finish
Interior Materials: paint finish

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Click above for larger image

Design time: June 2010 - February 2011
Year of completion: September, 2011

Oshikamo by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Design team: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
Structure company: Masaki structural laboratory
Construction company: Inoue construction Ltd

  • edward

    Much to admire here, but a little like living n a lumber yard.

  • svp

    A rich variety of ideas and atmospheres in one house. A house designed around human activity, and expressive of family activities. I don't like the exterior but that's not really the important point in Japanese city housing. Nice tectonic expression.

    Still, I would prefer to live in the neighbouring house!

  • qrchitect

    It's a violence architecture. It ignores completely the surrounding situation and morphology. I'm so tired to see the egoism of the contemporary architects.

  • http://www.brgstudio.com nulla

    Great interiors!

  • http://uptodayarch.blogspot.com up_today_arch

    I like completely wooden structure of this house!

  • Mariana siqueira

    Better Inside than outside

  • Tony

    Nice shape and form, but why such narrow living and bedroom spaces when the width of the site allows better?