Wickstead Lodge by Baynes & Co

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Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

An electronically controlled stone wall slides across the facade of this house in Warwickshire, England, to conceal a large window.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

Designed by British architects Baynes & Co, Wickstead Lodge replaces a traditional vernacular house that formerly occupied the site.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The moving wall was created to overcome a planning requirement stating that the new house should have only small windows, like its predecessor.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

Narrow gaps in the stonework let light pass through the wall into the dining room behind.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The whole of this lower floor was also set just below ground level so that the two-storey house wouldn't be taller than permitted.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

We also recently featured a house in Bath constructed from a similar pale stone - take a look here.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

Photography is by Stuart Whipps.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The text below is a description from Adrian Baynes:


The project was a new house to replace an existing one.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The planning authority imposed considerable constraints in terms of massing, roof height, materials & design.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

They wanted a replacement single storey house, with small windows, of traditional construction.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The client wanted a two storey, contemporary house.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The solution was to sink the building into the ground and create three gables so as to minimise the impact from the road.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

However from the rear it is a substantial two storey development.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The biggest difficulty was the planners requirement for small windows to match those in the original house.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The answer was to install the largest double glazed window available and then construct a steel framed stone wall in front of it.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The stone was bonded in place so as to allow the light to penetrate through the joints.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

However the entire wall was mounted on an geared electric motor powered track to allow it to move like a giant curtain.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

By careful engineering the wall was mounted without any top support.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

The building was constructed with stone gables & a matching brick, with terne coated stainless steel roof with roll batten joints to replicate a traditional lead roof.

Wickstead Lodge by Adrian Baynes

  • http://www.sensetik.dk/udbraendthed Sebastian

    Wow, cool! What does a house like that cost? I especially like the door-system :P.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nickhowett Nic Howett

    How much would that moveable wall have cost, and what does it really add to the architecture? Surely simple shutter would have been much better, wont break over time. Ultimately this wall will end up not being used!

    • Shavool

      With respect, I think you're very wrong.

  • Dom

    Quite interesting. Stone is always perceived as stationary and immovable, so a moving stone wall challenges that, almost like one of those ancient ruins in an Indiana Jones film.

  • modernstump

    The light that passes through the wall adds a lot of character . THe overall exterior design seems a bit cold though. If you were one of those Three Little Pigs you would probably rest pretty easy though!