House N by Sharon Neuman
and Oded Stern-Meiraz

| 15 comments

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Architects Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz have concealed a modern rectangular residence near Tel Aviv behind a brick wall shaped like a vernacular house with a chimney.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

A wooden bridge connects the building’s top floor with a balcony that cantilevers through this grey-painted wall.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

A recessed door underneath the balcony leads through to an entrance courtyard behind, where the base of the chimney is revealed to be an outdoor fireplace and barbeque.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Inside the house, polished concrete stairs connect the two upper floors with the basement, while bricks walls are painted in the same colour as the facade.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

You can see more projects in Israel by clicking here.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Photography is by Elad Sarig.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Here's some text from the architects:


260sq m modern minimalist house is located in the unlikely setting of the rural town of even Yehuda, 20 minutes drive from Tel Aviv.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

The concept for the house was inspired by the work of minimalist artist Walter De Maria- Gothic Shaped Drawing that's is showing a basic one line 2 dimensional shape of a house, almost as is drawn by a child.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

A tall brick painted wall in a traditional shape of a house, together with an attached outdoor chimney, provide the needed privacy the clients requested towards the front, and contrasting with the rear of the house which is made completely of glass and is open to the back – facing north.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

A floating open bridge/balcony on the first floor also acts as a canopy for the main entrance underneath and leads visitors through a long gap in the external wall to the main entrance of the house.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

The house is on 3 floors: Basement with a shelter, a cinema and a play room, ground floor with a lounge, kitchen, and a tv room, first floor with a main bedroom suit, children rooms and work areas.

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Architects- Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Plot 500sqm

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Built area 260 Sqm

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

Located in Even Yehuda, Israel

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

House N by Sharon Neuman and Oded Stern-Meiraz

  • Colonel Pancake

    I see the barbecue pit for the ferrets, but where is the one for humans?

  • Benjamin

    "a modern rectangular residence near Tel Aviv behind a brick wall shaped like a vernacular house with a chimney."
    Whose vernacular? A brick construction with pitched roof and chimney would seem to suggest a European vernacular plonked in the Middle East. Of course most of the indigenous architecture was destroyed around 1948, so we wouldn't want any visual reminders of that would we?

  • panulli

    I don't really get the point of splitting the whole ground floor with a staircase. And what purpose does the room behind the kitchen have?

    • gabi

      it says "TV room".
      But what the purpose of the space behind-under the stairs in front of the door "in your face", that's the question . :)

  • douglas

    …. the facade which conforms to notions of 'traditional' architecture would be a riposte to local building committees and NIMBY local objectors.

  • douglas

    Clever idea that would work well in this country where local planning committees are obsessed with the notion that all new builds should be 'traditional' style designed 'in keeping' with existing architecture. I especially like the witty surrealist facade being made functional with the inclusion of the working barbecue fire.

    • gabi

      but the fireplace doesn't appear to be working at all !

    • Benjamin

      douglas – you should try London Borough of Hackney where a 17-storey residential block was clad in yellow brick and the top floor clad in faux slate so as to suggest a period roof. I kid you not. When does "contextualism" become an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

      • douglas

        Mmmmmmmmm… 'faux slate' … (dribbles down chin)

  • gabi

    here where i'm confused: is master bedroom and, more disturbing, master bathroom open to below and, to the whole space basically ?

    • nimai

      why should that be disturbing, not everybody has the same notion of disturbing, or of privacy for that matter, obviously the privacy the family cares for is seclusion from the public, but internally liberal, depends on how the family functions, standards should be flexible, and its not your house anyway… (:

  • heatherjli

    I like the huge window display from the back of the house. Gorgeous.

  • Steve

    Lets face it, it's a bit of a rubbishy old idea neither witty nor clever. The planning is flawed at a basic level, the occupants will soon tire of those stairs dividing the kitchen and living room. The idea of having an open toilet above the kitchen seems improbable and unhygienic, you can just see the guests standing around the kitchen table just as grandad makes his presence known above in the most undelightful manner.

    But seriously, this looks like the imposition of the architects misplaced vision onto an unsuspecting client who probably now rues the day he ever decided to get his dream home 'architect designed'

    • Zirafa

      toilet above the kitchen? too bad you can't even read a floorplan, its a desk, derrrrr. How about leave it to those with taste.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dchasemartin David Martin

    One hopes for more generous critique; admittedly this design challenges the notion of generosity. The brick wall offers an aspect of needed privacy but at the expense of an element clearly not fully considered inasmuch as the brick is treated like wallpaper…and the intellectual idea for its imagry fails to convince…perhaps because of its unfocused ambiguity. I don't believe ideas age, but I do believe they need to have compelling clarity and be expressive of age in which they are invoked.
    The collision of ideas, forms, materials, and planning of the lower portion of the stair, banging up against the glass wall point to a general condition of the need for the designers to redouble their commitment to rigourous self-criticism.