Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

| 12 comments

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Here are some photos of the latest collection of Sire spectacle frames, which are made of water buffalo horn.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Designed by Zurich studio Aekae and manufactured by Swisshorn, the frames are made by hand from thin laminated layers of horn.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Aekae showed the first six Sire frames on Dezeen back in 2009 and have since expanded the range to 18 frames for sunglasses and correctional lenses, all with the same distinctive gap between the lenses at the nose bridge.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Check out our top ten stories about spectacles and shades here.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Stills are by Sandra Kennel. Portraits are by Nadine Ottawa.

Here are some more details from Aekae:


SIRE - handcrafted natural horn eyewear

Origin

A Sire was a Gentleman of rank, a Nobleman of certain esteem. He was a man of authority, a Cavalier, a Knight. It was from the 13th century on that Sire was used as a title to address someone of high regard.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

And as such, a Sire had the ambition to only wear what was of refined quality and unique appearance, whereat he would always find it made by the hands of the best craftsmen.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

At SIRE we aim to pursue those traditions and cater to them with craftsmanship, sharp designs, and fine materials – to be worn by Noblemen and Gentlewomen.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Crafting

Each single piece of SIRE eyewear is handcrafted out of natural horn in collaboration between Aekae and Swisshorn.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

A small manufacturing company in the midlands of Switzerland, Swisshorn has been working with the high-value material for years. It produced numerous prototypes of SIRE spectacles before the first line had been launched.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Designing the eyewear, Aekae builds on the tradition of using natural horn as a working material for premium objects. The spectacles’ open part just above the nose has made for a capturing feature ever since the first pieces.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

By bringing together their respective skills and impressions, Aekae and Swisshorn create something truly noble and unique.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Natural Horn

SIRE spectacles are hand crafted into exquisite eyewear from water buffalo horn. This mighty animal is South-East Asia’s most common livestock and can grow horns up to two meters in length. And once a water buffalo has deceased its horns can be used in creating long lasting products.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Swisshorn hand selects every single piece of horn used in manufacturing SIRE spectacles. Because it is a natural material, each piece of horn differs in color and pattern – and therefore makes each frame unique.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Manufacturing

Take something rough and turn it into something smooth and elegant. This is what happens in the process of making SIRE eyewear. And it happens in numerous steps, almost entirely by hand.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Initially thin layers of horn are laminated to plates from which the frame of the spectacle is cut out of. In several steps the frame and its earpieces are crafted and polished. After they’ve been brought into perfect shape the separate pieces are put together. With the use of a laser each frame then receives its individual number of reference that is unique to every single SIRE frame.

Sire by Aekae and Swisshorn

Finally, the lenses are inserted. Here the open nose part takes advantage of the material's natural flexibility. To secure the glass, a special thread is pulled through the opening at the nose.

  • xtiaan

    lovely material and workmanship,
    but the gap at the top of the nose is really distracting, talk to anyone wearing these and you wont be able to look them in the eye, youll be too busy staring at that gap thinking "what they paid for those frames could pay my rent for a few weeks but they still left that annoying gap dammit"

    • jed_

      my thoughts exactly. that gap is a well made detail but it looks awful.

  • BB83

    f*cking expensive :(

  • Andrew

    I don't want to even know the price….

  • Chris

    I just hope all the buffaloes are truly dead of old age before the horns are used… Dig the look though, stylish.

  • The Empra

    should've gone to specsavers
    -b

  • http://www.dekdo.com Derek

    Ive been looking for glasses like this(with the gap) forever… Why cant they make a model at a lower pricepoint with a less excotic/more normal material…????

  • http://www.dekdo.com Derek

    Does anyone know of other brands that make glasses in a similar style that dont cost 1500….

  • KB Tay

    Water buffalo horn, rhino horns does it matter? they are animal by-products.

    Imagine the immense amount of animal suffering behind these beautiful frames sitting on your nose… just because a designer has picked horn as the material for his/ her project. Material science can produce better material than what nature provides, can't we make something with conscience?

    No, the buffaloes died because of their horns not because they were old.

  • qhsj

    I think many people here freaking out about the water buffalo issue here probably eat beef and wear leather… You know the water buffalo is not endangered right?

  • Goldeneye

    Agree.. just read the info above: «SIRE spectacles are hand crafted into exquisite eyewear from water buffalo horn. This mighty animal is South-East Asia’s most common livestock and can grow horns up to two meters in length. And once a water buffalo has deceased its horns can be used in creating long lasting products.»

    I own a pair of natural horn spectacles myself, and they are more comfortable than anything I've ever had before.. unfortunately the material can only be crafted by hand, which makes it expensive. love it or leave it.

  • http://www.fashion.eastgradcreative.com/ EastGrad Fashion

    I haven’t tried out natural horn spectacles but if it is expensive , there has to be a good reason behind it. I personally find the style more appealing than the material used. It would be nice to experiment with the look (the gap)with something at a lower cost. If it works, go for the expensive ones, if it doesn’t then you are free to toss them away.