Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

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Following the popularity of the bookcase without shelves that we published earlier this week (above, top right) here's a roundup of the ten most-clicked stories from Dezeen featuring more clever ways to display your reading material. 

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

1: in first place is this extending bookcase by Rotterdam designer Reinier de Jong.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

2: second place goes to this controversial shelf by San Francisco designers Mike and Maaike with slots specifically cut to house seven seminal books about power and society.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

3: next up is this adaptable display system for the book shop at Somerset House in London by design graduate graduate Fotis Evans.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

4: Patricia Urquiola's Shift shelving system for B&B Italia is in fourth place.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

5: Julien De Smedt's system for Danish brand Muuto comes in fifth.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

6: the Floors system, comprising aluminium slats on wooden frame by BIG is sixth in our readers' top ten, despite commenters at the time labeling it "a little generic" and even "offensively boring".

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

7: hese wonky bookshelves by Smånsk were amond the most popular of our stories from Stockholm Furniture Fair in 2008 and come in seventh in our roundup of most-clicked bookcases.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

8: Reinhard Dienes' furniture that can be reconfigured as a sideboard or bookcase by changing the position of the legs is in eighth position.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

9: At number nine are these robot-shaped shelves by Fabio Novembre.

Dezeen's top ten: bookcases

10: And finally, the Mondrian Corian bookcase on wheels designed by architect Vladimír Ambroz is in tenth place.

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