Animal: The Other Side of Evolution
by Ana Rajcevic

| 17 comments
Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

London College of Fashion graduate Ana Rajcevic has created a series of tusks, horns and spines for the human body.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Called Animal: The Other Side of Evolution, the sculptural pieces are based on exaggerated animal skeletons and designed to fit over the face, neck and head.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

They're made in complex moulds from fiberglass, resin and silicone.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Rajcevic's project won the London College of Fashion MA Design Award 2012.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Photographs are by Fernando Lessa.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

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Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Here's some more information from Rajcevic:


The project is grounded in a unique visual interpretation of animal anatomy, building upon existing skeleton structures to create a series of sculptural pieces that appear as natural properties of the human body, suggesting strength, power and sensuality.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Concepts of mutation and evolution are explored in order to develop a contemporary cross-image of human and animal, an atemporal, supreme creature, beyond past and future.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

The goal was to fabricate a collection of 8 pieces of personal adornment, that would not be specifically categorised as jewellery or accessories.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

The idea was to step out of the traditional jewellery/accessories context in order to develop a ‘new breed’ of precious objects that can be exhibited both separately on their own and fully attached to the human body.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

All of the objects were handcrafted creating multi-part master molds, using gelcoat, fiberglass, resin and silicone rubber.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

The pieces perform a double function: they exist as fashion objects attached to the wearer, as well as separate art works, exhibited in gallery spaces. Because of this dual quality they can be considered fashion artefacts in the true sense: objects of desire, rather than just mere adornments.

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

WINNER OF THE MA DESIGN AWARD 2012, LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION, UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS LONDON

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Model: Anna Tatton
Hair and make up: Sarah Frasca

  • p rider

    absolutely stunning… should be in the next ridley scott sci fi epic…
    quite incredible and striking conceptual forms.

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    Deadly prank to model in last pic:

    –Hey, you've got something in your stomach!

    –Where?

    *stares down*

    *impales herself*

    *drops dead*

  • turnip

    That's just what i needed.

  • steve

    This is the dumbest thing I've ever seen.

  • Richard

    I don't feel like I should like it but I love it

  • zeemmee

    Please dezeen dont post nude pics. I don’t want you blocked in this country :(

    • http://www.dezeen.com Marcus Fairs

      Which country are you in? Have we been blocked before?

      Marcus, Dezeen

  • wpgmb

    these are disturbing.

  • http://www.AaronMaxDesign.com Aaron Max Epstein

    Looks like a Bleach Arrancar rip off.
    http://download.minitokyo.net/Bleach.393609.jpg

  • http://compositionzerotwo.blogspot.de/ steffi

    it looks a little creepy and reminds me of totem masks

  • sara

    i love when design surprises me. great work.

  • http://arquiestudio.wix.com/arquiestudio Fernando

    I love it, very organic design!

  • Jenny

    I'd love to be invited to a cool enough party that I could wear these.

  • My-Oh-my

    Very powerful visuals and impressive molding results! Creme white is the good color choice and the model is expressive in a way that suits the objects even more.

    I'm curious as to how they would look on a chubby face (isn't fashion for every"body" after all?)

  • Fizz Fieldgrass

    OK – now I might be about to upset a lot of people here but I make no apology for attempting to try and lift the veil from the eyes of many who might just accept on face value what we are given because these objects may seem ‘cool’, ‘post-post-post modern’, ‘innovative design relevant to the human condition’ or any other desperate statement uttered to defend a project having no merit whatsoever.

    Never have I seen for a long time such a preposterous proposition and pretentious concept as presented here. You just have to read the statements of intent to recognise their vacuity: “mutation and evolution are explored in order to develop a contemporary cross-image of human and animal, an atemporal, supreme creature, beyond past and future”. Ask yourself: does it really achieve this? Or are we looking at funny plastic bits worn in a very silly way?

    “The pieces perform a double function: they exist as fashion objects attached to the wearer, as well as separate art works, exhibited in gallery spaces. Because of this dual quality they can be considered fashion artefacts in the true sense: objects of desire, rather than just mere adornments.”

    Fashion objects? Art works? Really? Do take a long hard look at them. Fashion as a creative form has to some extent always been allowed some slack for its excessive and sometimes bizarre creations. But these are generally seen (as maybe fitting to the whole notion of Fashion) to be playful or self-referential. Things come unstuck when one tries to introduce some profundity into the proceedings. And as for Art, place any of these bits next to say, a Brancusi and then decide on the plausibility of that hopeful idea.

    “Objects of desire” indeed. If silliness is a commendable state then fine, but this really is just a sad indictment on what lengths nowadays our culture goes to when striving for innovation and originality. Nothing wrong with that, only such goals should have a strident intellectual underpinning which I believe is lacking in some of today’s creative establishments. That the work actually won a design award is incredulous, the mitigation being that it was after all a fashion award so, recognised via a hermetically sealed world view then.

    I would have like to have said the designs are jaw-dropping in their banality but of course as we see, most do not allow the wearer even that particular function.

    • douglas montgomery

      You can't rationalise away peoples aesthetic response (or make your case intellectually irrefutable by name-checking Brancusi). I personally find these visually interesting, and other people evidently find them so.

      A) Who the hell are you to 'disabuse' us of our response?

      B) Define profundity

  • douglas montgomery

    "You just have to read the statements of intent to recognise their vacuity" ;

    "OK – now I might be about to upset a lot of people here but I make no apology for attempting to try and lift the veil from the eyes of many who might just accept on face value what we are given because these objects may seem 'cool', 'post-post-post modern', 'innovative design relevant to the human condition' or any other desperate statement uttered to defend a project having no merit whatsoever."

    Fizz Fieldgrass

    ….. out of the horses mouth