Hidden House by
Teatum+Teatum

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Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

Perforated steel doors fold open like the wings of a butterfly at the backstreet entrance to this London house by architects Teatum+Teatum.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

Named Hidden House, the residence is squeezed between two existing buildings and has a glittering facade of black render and metal filings.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The folding metal doors lead into a ground-floor living room and kitchen, where chunky chipboard walls integrate kitchen counters, shelves and a desk.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

There are no windows, but a seven-metre-high lightwell brings natural light in from above.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

First-floor bedrooms are positioned either side of the lightwell and also receive daylight from funnel-shaped skylights.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

Other London houses we've featured recently include one with an oak staircase and another clad in rubber.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

Photography is by Lyndon Douglas.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

Here's a project description from Teatum+Teatum:


Hidden House – T+T 001

Using the left over spaces of the city, Hidden House is formed between existing buildings.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The house makes an opportunity of its dislocation from the street. It turns its back to the city and responds to its location by creating an architecture that is internal and intimate.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The house is organised over two levels and structured around a seven metre high internal light well. Living spaces interface across the central light well, allowing bedrooms and living areas to overlap and connect.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

This interface between spaces seeks the opportunity for programmes to infect one another.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The connection to the exterior is formed through high level skylights that bring daylight into the bedrooms and the central light well. By removing external views the sense of interior is reinforced, creating intimacy and a focus on light and materiality.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The rear elevation, a black shining surface, embedded with silica carbide particles acts like a mask in that it engages the viewer without expressing or revealing the space behind.

Hidden House by Teatum+Teatum

The steel butterfly doors are laser cut to reflect the pattern of rain on a cold window. Internally, the laser cut pattern allows shards of light to extend into the hidden spaces of the ground floor interior. Hidden House provides a way for the city to create more housing on existing sites providing unique spaces at low cost.

  • http://www.stoett.com stoett22

    The perforated steel doors are a great idea. Not only are they fashionable and unique, they also fulfill the function of letting natural light in, even though the doors are black. It also looks quite solid to keep out unwanted intruders or to deter them from breaking in. One issue though, when happens in summer when the sun is blazing hot? Will the steels doors absorb the heat and make the interior warmer than it should be? Also, I do not see any keyhole, how does one open the door?

  • phil

    I have actually seen the house and it is fantastic. The scope for this to be repeated within London is enormous. It is located in a mews- formally an alley behind a high street and has a fair amount of light industrial activity going on around it. It achieves total privacy and scale without subtracting anything from the existing landscape.