Library House by
Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

| 13 comments
 

A living and dining room with six-metre high ceilings sits at the centre of this small white house in Japan by architects Shinichi Ogawa & Associates (+ slideshow).

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

The house was designed with a square-shaped plan, creating a symmetrical building where all rooms surround the central living space.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

The entrance sits at the centre of the east facade and leads straight into the living room, so there was no need to add any extra corridors.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

A wall of bookshelves lines the edge of this room, while a long narrow skylight spreads natural light across the space and glass doors lead out to private courtyards at the north and south ends of the house.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

"It is a house for a client who is a great reader," says Shinichi Ogawa & Associates. "He can live enjoying his reading time in this quiet but rich space, feeling the change of seasons thanks to the closed courtyards."

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

The architects add: "The toplight makes it an impressive space, giving sky view and natural light from the upper side."

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Bedrooms and a bathroom wrap around the west and north sides of the house and an office is positioned in the south-east corner so that the client can work from home.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Library House is located in a residential area in Tochigi and is constructed from concrete.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Shinichi Ogawa first established his studio in the 1980s and has offices in Tokyo and Hiroshima. Past projects include the long narrow Minimalist House in Okinawa and Cube House in Kanagawa, which also features a double-height living room.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

See more houses designed by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates, or see more stories about Japanese houses on Dezeen.

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Above: site plan

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Above: floor plan

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Above: section north to south

Library House by Shinichi Ogawa and Associates

Above: section west to east

  • Juan Galicia

    I keep looking at that table and those book shelves and can´t help but think it would look a lot better if the shelves where that same colour. I actually like the space; it’s just a bit cold.

  • Desk

    This is a copy and prettification of Casa Guerrero. Oh well.

    • h.a.

      Actually it’s been a long time since I thought that current Japanese architecture has a great debt to Alberto Campo Baeza. Particularly Sejima, whose language was used by Alberto long before.

  • Concerned Citizen

    So, you put some unreachable shelves in a house and now it’s a library. What do you call it when the TV projection causes the viewer extreme neck strain while attempting to watch it from the only visible seats in the house?

    What’s the point of continuing to showcase these failures?

  • Jobe

    Makes Adolf Loos appear Rococo.

  • Vee

    The name Library House seems a bit pretentious for an empty bookshelf.

  • Alberto

    Scharounian.

  • http://www.starcruzer.com MrJ

    I ache to paint some form of trompe l’oeil on those blank-canvas white walls. I trust they have a ladder for the top shelves.

  • http://tsoc.dk Mr. S

    It’s a special house, but I kind of like it. I would prefer bigger windows.

  • JMA

    Check out Alberto Campo Baeza’s Guerrero House.

  • al-pro
  • G Frobisher

    The outside street profile was such a great initial shock. In its extreme simplicity it immediately reminded me of Georgia O’Keeffe’s Ranchos Church painting. I have mixed feelings about the interior; love the courtyards, the light, not so much the liveability as a real live home.

  • Sultony

    Yuck! More boxy design, plus the impractical, clinical, inhuman white aesthetic, which is of course the temple of modernism/minimalism.