Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by
Stadtlabor and Wolfgang Meraner

| 4 comments
 

The rippled aluminium cladding of this climbing centre in northern Italy is dotted with tiny perforations that allow the walls to become see-through after dark (+ slideshow).

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

The Vertikale Kletterhalle, or vertical climbing gym, was designed by architects Martin Mutschlechner and Barbara Lanz of Stadtlabor, in collaboration with local architect Wolfgang Meraner in the town of Brixen.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

By day the building appears as an opaque box with a crumpled exterior inspired by the ripples of a curtain, but once the sun goes down the interior becomes visible and reveals climbers scaling the 15-metre wall inside.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

"We wanted the building to be hermetic during daytime and completely transparent at night," Mutschlechner told Dezeen. "The first idea was to create a curtain and the waving of the facade was added to create a moiré effect. It was very important for us to have a facade that changes transparency during the day and changes pattern if you move around the building."

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Climbers also benefit from the perforated facade, as it offers them a view towards the Dolomite Mountains on the horizon during the day. "The climbers love the transparency and bright interior," said Mutschlechner.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

An additional climbing wall is mounted onto the building's exterior so that climbers can choose to be subjected to the elements.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

The metal panels also form part of a multi-layered building envelope that incorporates a climate control system providing natural ventilation, heat storage and anti-glare filters.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Other unusual climbing centres completed in recent years include a centre with tread-like indents in its concrete facade and a climbing wall contained in a windowless yellow cube.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

See more stories about climbing walls or see all our stories about sports centres.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Photography is by G.R. Wett.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Here's a project description from the architects:


Indoor Rock Climbing, Brixen

The indoor rock climbing hall in Brixen arises close to the historic center and is therefore – compared to other similar sport infrastructures – designed with a high aesthetic and artistical claim.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Nature and landscape are transported into the building through a transparent façade design; at the same time, the inside remains visible to the outside. The multi-layer facade creates a moiré effect, generating always new impressions for the moving observer and both the users inside as also the viewer outside in a dynamic relationship to the climbing gym provides.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

In the planning of the climbing hall, ecological aspects and sustainability were essential. Through detailed planning and a sophisticated climate control system with multi-layer façade assembly, ventilation and heat storage by intermediate zones in the facade construction, as well as creation of thermal mass in the building. With the use of solar energy, the seasonally changing façade envelope and natural ventilation, mechanical cooling is not necessary and results in significant cost savings for construction and operating costs.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

The climbing hall is south-facing from the new town square, facing north from the upper City Park a connection to the new underground car park is provided; the disabled access guarantees also the use for therapeutic purposes.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

The open design of the climbing hall with free-standing climbing towers allows a view outwards on park and square, as well as inward on the entire hall. The technical concept makes the climbing hall suitable for sport climbers and recreational climbers, for training and competition.

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

Client: Community of Brixen, Italy
Architecture: ARGE Mutschlechner, Architekten Lanz, Arch. Wolfgang Meraner
Contractor: Frener & Reifer
Installation Engineering: Transsolar
Light advice: Halotech, Zumtobel

Vertikale Kletterhalle Brixen by Lanz + Mutschlechner and Wolfgang Meraner

  • Jay

    Wow! What a great little project. I would love to get the chance to design something like this in my lifetime – small, simple and a little bit of fun. Great job!

  • Concerned Citizen

    An expensive place for an artificial climb, while real mountains beckon in the backdrop. Could it be more ironic?

    • http://stadtlabor.org Martin

      Probably you are right. Still, indoor rock climbing cannot be compared to climbing mountains. This infrastructure is used mainly by kids, beginners and handicapped people. It is a 3D public space used by people like you and me to gather, chat and do something healthy.

      Compared to most of the projects shown on this website, this building was cheap. The energy system has a ROI of less than eight years.

    • Romain

      As with any gym, you train within a safe and convenient space, then you tackle the real obstacles once you are confident enough.

      I’m aware your comment was meant more as a joke by the way. But I’d have to say that this project will get some use precisely because the mountain beckons, and mountain-folk will want to hone their skills before heeding its call.

      Plus, indoor rock-climbing is just plain fun: it’s cheap, hassle free and you can have climbing meets or competitions. The space fosters a social context you wouldn’t have on the sheer face of a mountain. (How many people go to the gym to socialise?)