Cradle by Benjamin Hubert
for Moroso

| 15 comments
 

Product news: British designer Benjamin Hubert has created a chair with a hammock-like back for Italian furniture brand Moroso.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Called Cradle, the design is a cross between an upholstered lounge chair and a flexible hammock.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

The steel frame of the hammock supports a textile mesh, which has been CNC-cut to allow it to stretch around the sitter's shape.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

"The chair's aesthetic is purposefully architectural with a sharp rectilinear backrest contrasted with a softer seating area," explains Hubert.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

The chair was launched in Milan last month alongside another of chair by Hubert for Moroso, which looks as if it's wrapped in a cloak – see all Dezeen's coverage of Milan 2013.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Other designs by Hubert we've featured lately include a metal frame armchair that weighs only three kilograms and a family of terracotta pots with rubber lids – see all design by Benjamin Hubert.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Other Moroso furniture we've published includes Patricia Urquiola's chairs with backrests wrapped in rush and Nendo's chair shaped like a stiletto heel – see all furniture by Moroso.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Here's some more information from the designer:


Cradle is a new lounge chair launching at Salone Internazionale del Mobile in April 2013. The project is the result of a close collaboration between Benjamin Hubert and Italian brand Moroso.

The product is a unique blend of two typologies of seating – a net structured hammock and a conventional upholstered lounge chair. The chair's aesthetic is purposefully architectural with a sharp rectilinear backrest contrasted with a softer seating area, breaking traditional rules of seating typology and styling.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso
Talma chair (left), Net tables and Cradle chair, all by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

The chair stems from the studio's materials-driven, process-led industrial design approach, research into the construction of mesh materials, and a study of the relationships between traditional seating components.

Cradle utilises a custom-made cut pattern that allows a non-elastic textile to stretch in a controlled manner in a three dimensional form. This allows for the correct tension to comfortably support the body and both visually and physically reduces the product's weight and cost.

Cradle by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso
Prototype design

The chair comprises a metal frame supporting a non-elastic textile with a geometric cut pattern, which cradles an upholstered seat block.

Materials: CNC-cut Kvadrat textile mesh, steel frame, moulded polyurethane, Kvadrat textile

  • sarah

    Super fresh! I havn’t seen anything like this and in a good way. Great to see someone sitting in it too.

    • beatrice

      Except for the Jean Nouvel furniture with net-cut leather.

  • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

    I'm 6' 4". I fear that the backrest frame would hit me right in the neck :-/

  • seb

    It’s fairly radically minimal in some respects, particularly from a traditional styling approach. Having said that I think it works and is refreshing compared to the dirge of midcentury-inspired chairs usually on here.

  • Sean

    Very nice! Something quite unique here.

  • Phil

    A great collection for Moroso, Benjamin. Congratulations!

  • http://www.behance.net/idntt Tarek
  • Gina

    It's like a contemporary lounge version of a deck chair in some way I think. Would look good as an outdoor seat too.

  • http://www.trendoffice.blogspot.com trendoffice

    Is it worth designing just for the purpose of making something fresh?

    • lookin good

      Yes it CERTAINLY is. You think once a design is made it stays in production forever? New things need to be designed or life becomes stale and un-livible.

  • kevin

    Oh yes. Fascinating, I want to experience it.

  • anotherjealous1

    I’m always excited to see a new Hubert article pop up on Dezeen, obviously not because of the ‘actual’ project but because of the inevitable comments that make me feel less alone in being an envious, frustrated and disillusioned young designer.

  • dog tanion

    As a threesome their family relationship, as formalised through colour and mesh, is a wee bit tenuous.

    • Tim

      I don’t think they are meant to be a family, rather three different families designed for Moroso.

  • Sam

    Not the most comfortable Moroso lounge chair! Seems like a bit of test-rig still.