Shadow House by
Jonathan Tuckey Design

| 7 comments
 

London studio Jonathan Tuckey Design has converted a historic chapel in Wiltshire, England, into a house with a blackened-timber extension conceived as the building's shadow.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

The architects were only permitted to build an extension that would be invisible from the street. "The form was generated by the parameters of building something as big as possible within the chapel's shadow, so that led to the consideration of materials reminiscent of a shadow," Jonathan Tuckey told Dezeen.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

The roof and every wall of the extension is clad in bitumen-stained larch, with flush detailing around the edges of the gable and chimney. It is built over a series of reconstructed dry-stone walls.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

"The clients, the planners and us were all keen to create something different to the original building, rather than mimic it," said Tuckey.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

All four of the house's bedrooms are contained inside the new structure, while the former vestry of the chapel functions as a library and the large hall is converted into an open-plan kitchen and living room with a mezzanine gallery above.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

A transparent glass corridor links the extension with the two adjoining buildings of the chapel and can be opened out to the garden in warmer weather.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by James Brittain

Other church conversions we've featured on Dezeen include a bookstore inside a former Dominican church in Holland and a church converted into an auditorium in Spain.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Above and top: photographs by Dirk Lindner

See more buildings clad with blackened wood, including a weekend house in Japan.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Photograph by Dirk Lindner

Here's a short project description from the architect:


Shadow House - Transformation of a Grade 2* listed chapel in Wiltshire into a family home

Our clients were intent on preserving the historic character of this elegant historic chapel but needed to adapt the building to accommodate the needs of their young family and connect it to the garden at the rear of the site.

Shadow House by Jonathan Tuckey Design
Site overview diagram - click for larger image

Complementing the existing chapel's form and scale the new extension sits on re-built dry stone walls in the garden and is unseen from the street. It is clad in blackened timber, echoing the vernacular tabernacle churches of the West Country; a quiet shadow of the original building.

A glazed transparent passage, which can be opened entirely in warmer weather, links the extension back to the chapel where the mid-19th century spaces have been refurbished.

  • calle wirsch

    Good concept, nice form, but repulsive to coat natural wood with sticky bitumen to get the colour (and, sure, extend life expectancy). Today there are better ways to treat it.

    • monkeyjam

      Such as? You can’t criticise and say something is incorrect without suggesting alternatives. This smacks of jealously or ignorance.

      The timber treatment looks fine to me – it’s not sticky in my experience (does it even look sticky in the images?)

      A very beautiful and well considered project.

      • calle wirsch

        A beautiful project with inappropriate instruments outside.

        There are several possibilities to darken wood, such as temperature processes, varnishes, glazes, and using other kinds of wood.

        For me, as a nature lover, bitumen is a strange treatment for natural wood. Reminds me of sticky, smelly railway planks. Sorry.

        • christine

          Maybe the architect was not a nature lover, whatever that term means and implies about political correctness.

  • JB

    You could probably also stain the wood or use charred wood, which would probably be the most environmentally friendly way to do it.

  • charles

    Yes, and don’t use glass as it takes so much energy to make!

  • http://www.octavian-ungureanu.ro Octavian Ungureanu

    I agree with monkeyjam: a very beautiful project!

    The use of the blackened wood is okay as it shows respect of the old architecture and a detachable volume of the addition, making a clear difference between the two parts.

    @ calle: Every time we design anything there might be different and maybe better ways to do it. But this is the beauty of it, you always have to stop somewhere and stick with an idea.

    Hundreds architects would produce hundreds solutions, but I bet this one would be one of the best!