Lifted-Garden House by
Kazuhiko Kishimoto/acaa

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Japanese architect Kazuhiko Kishimoto has combined a doctor's surgery and a courtyard house in a bulky building with tapered concrete feet (+ slideshow).

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_22

Located in Kanagawa, Japan, Lifted-Garden House was designed by Kazuhiko Kishimoto with a two-storey clinic on one side, a first-floor doctor's apartment opposite and a courtyard and roof terrace inbetween.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

"The clinic and dwelling place are placed across from each other with the inner courtyard in the middle, however the direction of the eyes would not meet since they are on different levels," says the architect.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

The exterior walls feature a mixture of bare concrete and timber slats, with the solid concrete pillars supporting the overhanging first floor.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

The courtyard beyond is filled with trees and shrubs, while the first-floor terrace is covered in timber decking and features plants that sprout from pockets of gravel.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

This deck can be accessed from both the apartment and the clinic, plus its timber surface continues into the building to create a consistent ground plane.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

White-painted bars divide up the spaces within the residence, continuing the vertical rhythm of the timber slats on the facade.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

The clinic features frosted glass screens that partially cover the windows, creating privacy while allowing views out to the greenery.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

"We expect the trees to grow big and to provide nice leafy shade in summer, making a place of relief for the doctor and patients," says Kishimoto.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

We previously featured another house by Kazuhiko Kishimoto, with a rear facade that slides open to reveal a graduated terrace with a sweeping view of the sea.

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_27

Earlier this year we published a two-storey house that has been combined with a pet shop, also located in Japan.

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_27

See all our stories about Japanese houses »
See more stories about medical architecture »

Lifted-garden House by acaa

Photography is by Hiroshi Ueda.

Here's a project description from the architect:


This is the complex building with clinic on the first floor and the doctor's dwelling place on the second floor. With the tree planting that bring better feeling to patients in the inner courtyard, they can be viewed from the lobby and entrance of the clinic.

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_7

Furthermore, as the trees can also be seen from outside of the building through the deck, people walking by should also be able to feel the seasons change.

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_7

The dwelling place on the second floor is placed as if it is floating above the parking space. The dwelling place is L-shaped opposite to the clinic. The clinic and dwelling place are placed across each other with the inner courtyard in the middle however the directions of the eyes would not meet since they are in the different levels.

Lifted-garden House by acaa

The roof of the clinic is an open area as the rooftop garden. Various types of plants and trees are established on the stair-like wood deck with different levels. The floor of the dwelling place continuing flat to wood deck is the outcome of the careful consideration into details.

Dezeen_Lifted-garden House by acaa_27

The deep and low canopy top makes the proportion of the beautiful building. It also relates immensely to producing the sense of openness to the rooftop. We expect the trees to grow big and to provide nice leafy shade in summer, making a place of relief for the doctor and patients.

Lifted-garden House by acaa
Ground floor plan - click for larger image and key
Lifted-garden House by acaa
First floor plan - click for larger image and key
Lifted-garden House by acaa
Cross section one - click for larger image and key
  • HDT

    Can anyone tell me why these Japanese houses never have central air/heating? Why do they always have those ugly reverse cycle boxes on the walls?

    • Rolf

      That’s AC for the summer. Installing central AC is much more expensive than central heating.