The Pool at Pyne
by T.R.O.P.

| 7 comments
 

Aerial photographs reveal the angular geometries of this rooftop swimming pool in Bangkok by Thai landscape architects T.R.O.P. (+ slideshow)

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

The swimming pool is positioned over the podium of a 42-storey residential complex close to the city's main station. Both residents and passing travellers look down on the pool from above, so T.R.O.P. added a canopy of concrete frames that appear from above to slice the water up into different sections.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

"Most pools in Bangkok [...] are called 'Sky Pool', because of a location on top of the roof," said designer Pok Kobkongsanti. "The first couple of ones sounded very exciting, but, after a while, it got boring."

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

He continued: "To make our pool different than the others, the 'Skeleton', a light cladded structure, was proposed to frame the swimming pool three-dimensionally."

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

The outline of the pool is made up of straight lines with curved edges. The team avoided perpendicular lines where possible and arranged wooden decks and planting areas around the perimeter.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

"Instead of a typical rectangular pool deck, we proposed a series of smaller terraces integrated with the swimming pool," added Kobkongsanti.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

Low-level lighting lines the edges of the space, creating a welcoming environment for nighttime swimmers.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

Other recent examples of the growing popularity of aerial photography in architecture include a photography series showing bedrooms viewed from above and an image taken from the mezzanine of a recently completed Japanese house.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

See more swimming pools on Dezeen, including a floating cross-shaped pool proposed for New York.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.

Photography is by Wison Tungthunya.

Read on for more details from TROP:


The Pool @ Pyne by Sansiri

Bangkok has changed. So have her people. In the past, we may prefer to live in small houses outside the city areas, and commute in and out the city daily. Not anymore. To fit the present time's fast life style, New generation keeps moving in many condominiums inside the developed areas instead. Horizontal living is out. Vertical one is the thing to do.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.
Masterplan - click for larger image

As a result, Thai developers are competing hard for the perfect plots of land in town. No, they do not care much about how big the plot is, or how great the view it would get. As long as it is right next to the BTS (Bangkok's Sky Train) station, it is perfect. In 2010, Trop got a commission to design the Pool of Pyne by Sansiri, a high-end condominium in Bangkok. Its site is ideal. Located right in the middle of busy urban district, just 5 mins walk from the city's biggest shopping malls, the plot is about the right size, 2,900 sqm. To make it even better, it also has a BTS station right in front of the property.

Architecture-wise, most condominiums in Bangkok are quite similar. The residential tower is built on top of parking structure. Normally the parking part has a bigger floor plan than the tower, leaving the left over area as its swimming pool. The Pool @ Pyne by Sansiri is no different. It is designated to be on the 8th floor, which is also the roof of the parking structure. The area is a rectangular shape terrace, around 370 sqm.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.
Swimming pool plan - click for larger image

Having the train station right in front really helps selling residential units (sold out in 1 day). However, space-wise, the station is a nightmare for designers. It is designed as a huge structure, about a hundred metre long, 3-4 storey high. Basically, it is like placing a huge building right in front of your door steps. Together with other surrounding old buildings, our project is trapped among concrete boxes by all 4 sides.

In order to get rid of that boxy feeling space, our first move is to create a "loosed" floor plan. Instead of a typical rectangular pool deck, we proposed a series of smaller terraces integrated with the swimming pool. Perpendicular lines were avoided, replaced by angled ones with round corners. A series of "green" planters were also inserted here and there, combining all 3 elements, water, terraces and plantings seamlessly.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.
Cross section one - click for larger image

Again, most pools in Bangkok share the same name. They are called "Sky Pool", because of a location on top of the roof. The first couple of ones sounded very exciting, but, after a while, it got boring. Our design task was not only to design a pretty swimming pool, but we also wanted to created a unique landscape feature that can identify the character of our residents.

To make our pool different than others, the "Skeleton", a light cladded structure, was proposed to "frame" the swimming pool 3-dimensionally. Before, the so-called sky pool is just flat piece of water on top of the building. Sure, swimmers can enjoy a great prospect view outside, but, looking back to the building, nobody recognise the presence of that pool from below. With the "Skeleton", the pool was fully integrated into the architecture. Now the BTS passengers can look up and see the special space inside the frame. At night, the "Skeleton" glows, giving the architecture some "lightness" it needs badly in the crowded surrounding.

The Pool at Pyne by T.R.O.P.
Cross section two - click for larger image

Landscape Architects: TROP : terrains + open space
Design Director: Pok Kobkongsanti
Project landscape architects: Theerapong Sanguansripisut, Ekitsara Meedet
Architects: Palmer & Turner (Thailand) Co.,Ltd.
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Area: 370 sqm
Year: 2010-2013

  • recon::decon

    Okay I see how this finishes off the geometry of the elevation (ironically on the only photo that is not from above) but who is really going to see that? This seems like a wasted opportunity – this really adds nothing to the experience of being in that pool. Design for the sake of the design.

    • pppppp

      Half of the residents of the whole building will see the top view of the pool, actually.

      • nnn

        Yes, half of the residents will also see the bird poo.

    • yes

      The birds will probably sit on it and poop into the pool – more so than if it wasn’t there.

      The design would have been vastly improved if it included lighting on the frame and maybe a low level steps to get into the pool from a different angle. It is basically a futuristic gazebo.

  • http://twitter.com/thenakeddays @thenakeddays

    The bird’s eye view really seems to be the only favourable angle for this particular design.

  • Sam

    Seems very harsh and possibly a little over bearing to those using the pool, especially for what is a space used primarily for relaxing.

    The pool area itself though looks rather nice and I could imagine a very inviting break from the unbearable heat of Bangkok.

  • kkon

    There’s too little space for loungers compared to the whole building.