Sekki cutlery
by Nendo

| 1 comment
 

Product news: Japanese design studio Nendo has launched a range of cutlery that looks as though it's been carved from flint like prehistoric tools.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

Called Sekki, the set was created by Nendo in collaboration with metalwork firm Kobayashi Kogyo.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

"Kobayashi Kogyo is a metalwork firm located in the cradle of modern Japan's metal cutlery industry, the city of Tsubame in Niigata Prefecture," said Nendo.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

"The firm was founded in 1868, the first year of Japan's modern era, and enjoys a strong reputation for its command of metal production techniques, including polishing."

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

The three-piece set was designed to show off the firm's expertise and its crooked shapes recall implements carved from flint.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

"It's difficult to make the pieces' rough, nonstandard forms by machine, so the firm had to rely on its artisans' sensibility, skill and handwork," explained the designers.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

The concave surfaces were sandblasted to a matte finish while the other surfaces have been polished to a mirror finish, heightening the impression of sections being carved away.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

"The pieces' thickness and weight recalls stone, too," the designers added.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

"We flattened the pieces' backs to further make the connection with cutlery carved from lumps of stone, pressing the metal sheets seven times, rather than the usual one."

dezeen_Sekki cutlery by Nendo 11

The range will be available from Seibu department stores in Japan from 22 October.

dezeen_Sekki cutlery by Nendo 12

Other primitive kitcheware designs on Dezeen include a pair of ceramic cooking knives inspired by Stone Age tools and a stainless steel cooking knife that takes inspiration from tools used by early humans.

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

See Dezeen's top ten primitive designs »
See more cutlery design »
See more design by Nendo »

Sekki cutlery by Nendo

Photos are by Hiroshi Iwasaki.

  • Kalashnikat

    I’m not a design-oriented person, or an artist… just an old engineer, and I like this set. It’s really striking. From a practical perspective, if it lies flat on the table, isn’t it a little hard to pick up? ‘d buy a set if it were available in the States.

    I lived in Japan for 6-1/2 years in two different places, and found a lot of Japanese aesthetics appealing.