Spider's Thread by
Tokujin Yoshioka

| 5 comments
 

Mineral crystals grown on thin threads form the shape of a chair in this installation by Japanese designer Tokujin Yoshioka.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

Tokujin Yoshioka created the Spider's Thread sculpture of a chair by suspending just seven filaments within a frame that was sat in a pool of mineral solution.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

The solution was drawn up the threads and gradually formed into crystals around them, fleshing out into the shape of a piece of furniture.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

The project is a development of Yoshioka's earlier Venus chair, where crystals were grown on a sponge-like substrate.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

"Spider's Thread applies the structure of natural crystals in an advanced way aiming to produce a form even closer to the natural form," said Yoshioka.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

The designer says this iteration references a traditional story by Japanese writer Ryunosuke Akutagawa. "The Buddha takes a thread of a spider in Heaven and lowers it down to Hell so that the criminal can climb up from Hell to Paradise," explains Yoshioka. "In the story, the thread of a spider is a symbol of slight hope and fragility."

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

The piece is on show as part of a solo exhibition called Tokujin Yoshioka_Crystallize at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo until 19 Janueary 2014.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

There are three crystal chairs in the exhibition to show the different stages of growth.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

Yoshioka is known for his barely-there designs, and past work includes transparent plastic furniture that resembles cut-crystal glasses, a watch with a see-through strap and a tank of flying feathers.

Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

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Spiders Thread by Tokujin Yoshioka

  • Concerned Citizen

    This technology was discovered centuries ago with rock candy. I think the chair would be more appealing if it were made into rock candy.

  • Concerned Citizen

    I bet it hurts when you sit on it.

  • beatrice

    It walks the line between beauty and cliche and wins. Beautiful and intelligent. Hate the chair aspect, but why not.

  • Another concerned citizen

    This chair really contradicts with his fascination for creating a sitting experience as if you sit on a cloud, which he mentions in his book Tokujin. From that he made the honeycomb chair amongst others, all from this sense as if one is sitting on air.

    It went south I think from the moment he did the invisible Kartell chairs, which are square blocks of acrylic, that don’t imply the feeling of sitting on air. They have the visual trick of it, put the main feature of the chair is the sitting. And then he makes all these chair shapes from crystals?

  • pipo

    Just been to the show in MOT. It is by far one of the most pathetic exhibitions in a contemporary art museum I’ve ever seen.

    There is almost no art / design to be seen, spread out over several big spaces. All the texts have been written by Tokujin himself and are pitches for his products. To call him “one of the most influential artists in the world” is just beyond me.

    The design exhibition “Bunny Smash” on show at the same venue is actually great! And makes the visit worth going.