Wall House
by And'rol

| 4 comments
 

Precast concrete lintels with oozing courses of grout create a distinct facade on this house near Brussels by Belgian studio And'rol (+ slideshow).

Wall House by and'rol

Named Wall House, the three-story family home is located near to a former stronghold, so And'rol designed a grey-brick facade with concrete lintels to reference the crumbling stone walls of the old fortress.

Wall House by and'rol

"The relief of the bulging grout reinforces its rough character," said the architects.

Wall House by and'rol

A low wall surrounding the plot is constructed from the same materials, while the three remaining elevations of the house are clad with dark grey fibre-cement panels.

Wall House by and'rol

Square windows are scattered across all four elevations. Some are recessed, while others sit flush with the walls and some are screened behind horizontal concrete bars.

Wall House by and'rol

The house is located on the top of a steep hill and contains a split-level interior that negotiates a change in level across the site.

Wall House by and'rol

An asymmetric roof creates the necessary head height for the uppermost floor, which features a deep-set window facing out to the south.

Wall House by and'rol

The kitchen worktop is constructed from a stack of concrete slabs, referencing the building's exterior. Other interior details include a wooden staircase with integrated seating, low-hanging pendant lights and a selection of brightly coloured furniture.

Wall House by and'rol

Other houses we've featured from Belgium include a residence broken down into cubic volumes and a glass house with a sunken swimming poolSee more Belgian architecture »

Wall House by and'rol

Photography is by Georg Schmidthals.

Wall House by and'rol

Here's a project description from the architects:


Wall House

The plot's particularities are on the one hand its perturbing position close to a steep rock slope, and on the other hand its small depth and its unusual longitudinal orientation parallel to the street.

Wall House by and'rol

Starting point for the young Belgian architects were traces of a nearby former stronghold. The main design element consists of an enclosing wall with a recessed rising part, to which the modest and sober main house nestles and adapts.

Wall House by and'rol

A second shallow volume that houses a large number of storage spaces is also located behind the wall.

Wall House by and'rol

The architects chose precast concrete lintels as a reinterpretation of the old fortress walls of rubble stone. The relief of the bulging grout reinforces its rough character.

Wall House by and'rol

Inside, a split-level organisation responds to the plot's sloping ground, intensifies the open space concept and gives the compact building a generous and spacious character.

Wall House by and'rol

The used materials are deliberately kept simple and easy; the bare prestressed concrete slabs, the polished concrete flooring and the concrete bar refer to the enclosing wall.

Wall House by and'rol
Floor plan - click for larger image

Type: Single family
Location: Near Brussels, Belgium
Client: Private
Architect: AND'ROL

Wall House by and'rol
Section - click for larger image

Habitable surface:
Completion: July 2013
Construction: Hollow bricks, precast concrete slabs
Energy: Low energy standard

Wall House by and'rol
Elevation - click for larger image
  • Claire

    Not a fan of the barred windows.

  • Concerned Citizen

    I kind of like it, but what happens to those mortar flakes and joints after a couple of freeze-thaw cycles?

    • Jacek Gabrielczyk

      As lintel bedding material is described as “grout” I presume it has a higher strength than mortar. I’m wondering more about the weathering from rain and lichen/algae growth, nevertheless it should provide ample habitat space for insects and spiders which the local bird population will appreciate.

  • Jacek Gabrielczyk

    Not much algae on that photo. How often is it cleaned?