Sandwichbike flat-pack wooden bicycle
by PedalFactory goes into production

| 13 comments
 

A flat-pack wooden bicycle that can be assembled in less than an hour has gone into production (+ slideshow).

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

PedalFactory claims the Sandwichbike can be unpacked and put together in just 45 minutes. "If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike," the company declares.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

The single-speed bike is constructed from 19 parts that are packaged and delivered in a box along with the tools required to assemble it.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

The frame is made from panels of weatherproofed beech plywood and is held together by milled aluminium cylinders.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

Stainless steel spokes sit within the 26-inch tyres. The completed model weighs 17 kilograms.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

Pedalfactory was co-founded by designer Basten Leijh, who originally developed the bike with his Amsterdam design studio Bleijh for the 2006 International Bicycle Design Competition in Taiwan.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

The bikes are now available to order and the first deliveries in Europe will coincide with the official launch event, taking place in Amsterdam on Sunday. International orders will be dispatched early next year.

Read on for more details from the designers:


Product launch Sandwichbike: innovative designer bike now in production

The Sandwichbike will be launched in Amsterdam on Sunday 1 December 2013. This innovative wooden bicycle that already drew unprecedented attention worldwide in the design stage is now being shipped.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

After a period of extensive research and development the bicycle has now gone into production. The Sandwichbike can be delivered worldwide from December 1, 2013 onwards. The prototype was recently exhibited at various fairs and websites and was an instant hit among bicycle lovers and design.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

The Sandwichbike is a unique product on all fronts: material, design and production method. Its distinctive frame is composed of two weatherproof beech wood panels. Its advanced production technology makes self-assembly easy while a high quality standard is maintained.

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

Postal package

The bicycle is flat packed in a box containing the parts as well as all the tools needed. This creates a great unpacking experience. For enthusiasts, putting the bicycle together is part of the charm and the logistical benefits are huge as this enables worldwide delivery. Anyone from Amsterdam to Honolulu can receive a Sandwichbike by post.

Assembling a Sandwichbike is easy and takes less than an hour. "If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike."

Sandwichbike by PedalFactory

Pedalfactory

The Sandwichbike is a Pedalfactory B.V. product. Co-founder Basten Leijh (also: Bleijh Industrial Design Studio) designed and developed this bicycle. Leijh is an expert on bicycle design and innovation. Among many other product innovations Leijh developed a city-bicycle that could be locked by twisting the handlebars.

  • David

    This design is a giant leap back to the 19th Century. Bicycles were made from wood until innovative design lead to the adoption of steel and then aluminium tubes. Tubular construction is cheaper, lighter, and more durable. This bike is 17 kilos and costs €800! I’d much rather a Tokyobike.

  • Jan Osch

    17 kilos is very very much. A typical downhill bike weighs about 17-18 kilos; it is the most durable type of mountain bike with full suspension designed for bumpy roads, rocks and jumps from several meters height.

    Sandwichbike is a very snobistic and irrational product, and I don’t find it pretty. This is a very bad way of thinking about design.

  • Chris MacDonald

    I’m no health and safety fanatic and am a big fan of common sense. But where are the brakes?

    • Ohtheirony

      Brakes are so yesterday. It has fixed gears so that is how you brake. They really go all the way in dismissing all the innovations that have been made in bicycle design… And what for? For flat packing it?A bicycle spends maybe 0.0001% of its lifetime in packaged form, so why focus on that?

  • bigshape

    Sustainability and looking different aside, I struggle to see the point? I’m not knocking the design, it appears well thought-out and produced, but is there really a need for a flat-packed bike? You can get a normal bike delivered if you must buy online, which generally come pre-assembled aside from putting on the pedals and turning the bars. And 17kg! That is one heavy bike!

  • Saukko

    The packaging looks to be about the same size as a “normal” bike box where the bike is pre-assembled. I’d also argue that a traditional metal/carbon framed bike with no gears or cable brakes is no harder to build up than this one.

    I like the flat-pack philosophy when it comes to furniture, but here you are essentially trading all the qualities that make a good bike for a nice cardboard box and a few minutes of your time.

    • BenPS

      I agree, a regular bike frame isn’t that bulky. It seems stupid to focus on the packing part of the bike, when most bikes don’t spend much time packed, weigh ten times less than this, are more functional (with gears and brakes), and are easier to swap out components when they wear or break.

  • Daniel

    Hell! No breaks? Prepare your forehead.

  • sign

    “If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike”. I am sure I can, but I am not sure if I want.

  • Jeroen van Lith

    One can use a good bike for years. Why should it be so exciting that this comes in a package? Besides that, the design is simple in a very dumb way.

  • JayCee

    You can go to state bicycle company (or similar) and have a much lighter, more durable, steel fixie delivered to your door in a similar sized box for self assembly in about 15 minutes. And they cost under half the price.

  • jordi

    It’s nice but a little bit heavy for me!

  • AgendaBuster

    It’s from Europe, it must be better!