Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut
from block of foam using hot wires

| 10 comments
 

Milan 2014: Dutch designer Martijn Rigters created this rippled sofa by forcing a long block of foam through the gap between four hot wires.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

The Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters is a playful take on the methods used by design studios to prototype objects.

Hot wire foam cutting usually involves heating a thin piece of wire to cut through polystyrene quickly. In design studios, this is process is normally controlled very carefully, but Rigters wanted to make the process more random.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

"This technique offered the opportunity to explore a new process and experiment with the great three dimensional potential it has," Rigters said.

The designer created a series of unique shapes out of wire representing the seat and backrest, underside, back and front, then attached them to a wooden frame big enough for a block of polystyrene to pass through.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

The wires were connected to batteries, which provided the heat necessary for the polystyrene to be cut cleanly.

Setting the wires in differing profiles to begin with would alter the overall shape of the piece, but the final form and rippling effect was controlled by how the foam was pushed through the gap in the middle.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

"All movement of the user guiding the block through the machine is directly translated into a form," explained Rigters. "This is a very intuitive way to work, because one can react to the form that is created at that exact moment."

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

When completed, the couch was covered in a tough polyurea coating, making it suitable for use indoors or outdoors.

The process could be replicated on any scale, with the only limitation being the size of the foam available.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

Rigter will display the piece at Spazio Rossana Orlandi during the Salone Internazionale del Mobile next month.

Cutting Edge sofa by Martijn Rigters cut from huge block of foam using hot wires

  • H-J

    It looks so Eindhoven, love it.

  • http://www.quentindecoster.com Quentin de Coster

    Do you know Kwangho Lee, Dezeen?!
    http://www.kwangholee.com/works/2007_eps.html

  • http://www.inalcotrends.com/ Inalco Ceramics

    Just an amazing work. Congrats!

  • karolina

    Very sensual.

  • pipo

    Very gimmicky but it looks nice, yes.

  • fullhouse

    Certainly not a new technique, but in this experiment the result is quite powerful.

  • mitate

    No function, and a silly form. Just ghastly.

  • Richard Youel

    My whole 2012/13 MA Product Design project was based around the same hot wire cutting process. Please check out my Tumblr and Vimeo to see:

    http://richardyouel.tumblr.com
    http://vimeo.com/69902195

  • 2DCube

    I don’t mean to detract from this chaps experiments but, these shapes look like common off-cuts from freehand poly sculpting when making things for scenery, scenic sculpture and stage show stuff.

    Bits like that get chopped up and reused or thrown in the bin. One man’s treasure etc I guess? There are a lot of small scale companies that make poly shapes from preformed hot-wire, often creating extruded or revolved organic shapes. The ribs are created because the wire either isn’t hot enough due to the lack of power, or the piece of poly has been pushed through the die too quickly.

  • Tom

    I’ve seen this technique several times before, nothing new.