Tile-covered walls reflect light into Dublin
house extension by GKMP Architects

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Irish studio GKMP Architects added glazed white tiles to the angular walls of this extension to a semi-detached house in Dublin to help direct sunlight into the interior (+ slideshow).

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

GKMP Architects designed the Greenlea Road extension for the home of a family of five, who wanted a large, bright living area that improves the connection between the house and the garden.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

"The old layout included a dining room and garage extension to the west of the ground floor, which cut evening light to the interior and enclosed the kitchen within the plan, blocking light and access to the garden," architect Michael Pike told Dezeen.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

The existing extension built in the 1990s was demolished to make room for the new addition, which contains an open-plan kitchen, dining and living area filled with light from the windows and a central skylight.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

The shape of the walls and the shiny surfaces of the glazed tiles surrounding the doors and windows help funnel daylight into the extension.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

"The tiles were used for the texture they bring to a facade and for their ability to bounce light into the interior to brighten the terrace and garden spaces," explained Pike.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

GKMP Architects used terracotta tiles that resemble brickwork to clad another extension in Dublin. Tiles are well-suited for use as a practical and decorative exterior finish said Michael Pike.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

"Ceramic tiles are a very traditional material however they are not widely used externally in Ireland," Pike pointed out. "We use the tiles as a cladding to bring texture and warmth to a facade and also to highlight or draw attention to certain details."

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects

Door and window frames made from iroko wood stand out against the white ceramic tiles, but also contrast with green tiles that surround some of the windows and cover a low planter that extends towards the garden.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects
Model - click for larger image

A skylight lined with plywood introduces more light into the interior, while a polished concrete floor used throughout the ground floor helps to reflect it around the space.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects
Sketch - click for larger image

The kitchen features a cast concrete countertop that complements the floor and contrasts with the natural surfaces of the birch plywood benches and cabinetry. There is also a store room, utility room and shower room that continues around the corner of the house.

Photography is by Paul Tierney.

Read on for some information from GKMP Architects:


32 Greenlea Road

This project involves the demolition of a 1990s extension and shed to the rear of a semi-detached suburban house in Dublin, Ireland and the construction of a new single storey extension to the side and rear extending to 31sq.m. A new plywood kitchen and dining space open out to receive west light and connect to the back garden.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects
Floor plan - click for larger image

White glazed tiles bring texture to the facade and bounce light into the interior and onto the new polished concrete floor, whilst the cast concrete countertop then continues the language of the floor into the new plywood kitchen.

Tile-covered walls reflect light into Greenlea Road extension by GKMP Architects
Section - click for larger image

New windows are made from Iroko timber and green ceramic tiles are used to highlight certain window openings. The green tile is also used to draw attention and add scale to the washed concrete terrace. A large planter, clad also in green, seeks to bring the garden right up to the dining room window. Inside, a large, plywood-lined skylight marks the transition between old and new construction and serves to bring light into the centre of the living space.

  • http://batman-news.com Rachel Carmody

    Really lovely scheme and drawings.