Competition: five architectural sculptures
by Chisel & Mouse to be won

| 3 comments

Art Galleries

Competition: Dezeen has teamed up with UK studio Chisel & Mouse to give readers the chance to win a miniature architectural sculpture from their collection.

Congratulations to the winners! Sally Semple and Karl Mannerings in the UK, Andre Romitelli in Brazil, Julie George in the US and Andrea Krivanek in Bosnia. They each win a miniature architectural sculpture by Chisel & Mouse.

Mac buildings
Charles Rennie Mackintosh buildings including Glasgow School of Art, Willow Tearooms – Above: Art Galleries including Glasgow School of Art, Guggenheim Museum, Whitechapel Gallery

Chisel & Mouse has been producing handmade sculptures since it was set up in 2011 by brothers Robert and Gavin Paisley.

Century Hotel
Century Hotel, South Beach, Miami

Each piece in the collection is created with plaster and includes detailed windows etched in metal.

American Icons
American Icons including News Building, Cincinnati Union Terminal, Empire State, Monadnock, Greyhound Terminal

Five winners will get to choose their favourite design from a collection of over 45 different architectural sculptures, which includes buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Giles Gilbert Scott.

Trellick Tower
Trellick Tower, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London

The Chisel & Mouse workshop is located in Ashdown Forest, East Sussex, England, where the team produces bespoke commissions for sculptures of private homes, department stores and heritage sites.

Fisher apartments
Fisher Apartments, Chicago

Readers can enter the coupon code "Dezeen2014" to receive a 10% discount on Chisel & Mouse sculptures when buying online. The code is valid until the competition closes.

This competition is now closed/strong>. Five winners will be selected at random and notified by email. Winners' names will be published in a future edition of our Dezeen Mail newsletter and at the top of this page. Dezeen competitions are international and entries are accepted from readers in any country.

Here's some more information from Chisel & Mouse:


Chisel & Mouse is a family business owned and run by brothers Robert and Gavin Paisley. Our mission is to bring great architecture into people’s living rooms. We started Chisel & Mouse is 2011. We handmake our sculptures from a strong plaster which gives them a reassuring weight and a smooth, cool feel. Most feature fine details, such as window frames, etched in metal. Our sculptures are sold in many wonderful stores around the world, such as Paul Smith, Liberty, SCP, Future Perfect, National Building Museum and Axis, as well as on our website. Our workshop nestles in the Ashdown Forest, East Sussex, England.

Isokon Building, Hampstead London
Isokon Building, Hampstead, London

We love taking on bespoke commissions; working on projects as diverse as private homes, department stores, Stirling Prize nominees and heritage sites. All of our models are handmade in Britain by us - we pride ourselves on our quality workmanship.

Embassy Court, Brighton
Embassy Court, Brighton

We captures the essence of the building in our sculptures and models. We work from photographs and/or plans and drawings. The more information you have the better.

VC Morris Gift Shop, San Francisco
VC Morris Gift Shop, San Francisco

Our plaster sculptures work best when they are of a building’s facade or of a building’s integral architectural element. We have created skyscrapers in the whole using a mix of plaster and metal. We also 3D print models of buildings in their entirety, we can recreate internal features such as staircases and furniture and can even let you take the roof, floors and walls out so you can get right inside!

www.chiselandmouse.com

  • Elf

    Trellick Tower isn’t in Poplar, that’s Balfron Tower ;)

    • http://www.dezeen.com/ Dezeen Magazine

      Hi Elf,

      Thank you for pointing this out. We have amended the article accordingly.

      Kind regards,

      Ross/Dezeen.

  • Paul Nathanson

    If only someone would make a plaster model of the New York Yacht Club’s facade, a truly remarkable Beaux-Arts fantasy (Warren & Wetmore, 1901) and Grand Central Terminal (Warren & Wetmore, 1913).