Concrete Voidwall house by AND
is punctured by glazed incisions

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Glazed voids run up the sides and over the roof of this concrete house by South Korean studio AND, giving each room its own enclosed patio and increasing the flow of light inside (+ slideshow).

Voidwall by AND

In designing Voidwall, AND (Architecture of Novel Differentiation) cut slices out of the concrete structure on all four sides to explore the idea of a house built around terraces – described as balconies – rather than terraces built around a house.



"This project takes a balcony not as a bonus space but as an essential element that constructs a house," said the architects. "As a void wall, it divides the interior space and makes connections between the rooms."

Voidwall by AND

The indoor patios draw light into the centre of the single-storey house, which is located in the coastal city of Sokcho. They offer views between the different rooms in order to make the interior feel bigger than its 136-square-metre footprint.

Voidwall by AND

"Each room has its own balcony, and the house is defined by the characters of the balconies. In this house, the minimal element makes the whole," said the architects.

Voidwall by AND

All the patios are enclosed so they can be used year-round, but feature glazed doors that open up to the garden and terrace around the perimeter.

Voidwall by AND

The architects designed the spaces to suit a range of functions – some act as sunrooms or spaces to grow plants or dry clothes, while others offer more space to accommodate tables and chairs.

Voidwall by AND

"Balconies are an in-between space that connect the interior and exterior, and although they play an important role in experiencing the interior space, balconies have never received full attention in the discourse of architecture," said the architects.

"In most cases, a balcony either disappears as the interior space expands, or becomes a meaningless universal space that serves miscellaneous functions," they added.

Voidwall by AND

A roof terrace offers the occupants an additional outdoor space, and gentle slopes at the edge of the roof guide rainwater down to the garden below.

Voidwall by AND

Rooms are arranged on one floor, with the exception of a double-height volume at the entrance. This houses a bedroom on the upper level and provides access to the roof terrace.

Voidwall by AND

The more private spaces – two bedrooms and bathrooms, a study and a lounge – are arranged around the edge of the building, while the more communal space of the kitchen-diner is located in the centre, acting like a nexus between all the rooms.

Voidwall by AND
Site plan - click for larger image

White glossy surfaces in the kitchen help reflect light, contrasting with the dark tiles used for flooring throughout the rest of the space.

Voidwall by AND
Ground floor plan - click for larger image

The balconies also feature materials that contrast with the interior, lined with either timber or irregular-patterned tiles, to help differentiate them as separate spaces.

Voidwall by AND
Section - click for larger image

Photography is by Kyungsub Shin.

  • http://www.libertydisciple.com/ The Liberty Disciple

    A hermetically sealed concrete bunker, with airlocks for windows.

    There terraces provide a buffer between private and public, where the occupants are on strange display for their neighbors. The two missing elements for this scheme to work, would be vegetation as shade, and buffer, along with functioning windows, so you’re not trapped inside a soundproof concrete box.