Alpine cabins by Pedevilla Architekten build
on traditions of Tyrolean farmhouses

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Behind the dark facades of these farmhouse-inspired cabins in northern Italy, designed by local studio Pedevilla Architects, is a pair of bright homes that combine traditional elements with modern detailing (+ slideshow).

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Armin Pedevilla, who founded Pedevilla Architects with his brother Alexander, designed the La Pedevilla residences to provide both a permanent home for himself and his family, and a holiday retreat that can be rented out to tourists.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Located in a hamlet of Enneberg, South Tyrol, the two buildings reference features typical to Tyrolean farmhouses, alongside contemporary elements and locally sourced materials.




La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

The architect paired exposed concrete with Swiss pine to create a minimal interior. Windows occupy large areas of wall to frame views of the Alpine landscape.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

"The houses open up toward the valley where large windows retrieve and invite nature into the interior and offer breathtaking mountain panorama views," said Pedevilla Architects in a statement.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Exterior walls are clad with black-stained Alpine larch, creating a contrast between the dark exteriors and bright interiors.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Both buildings are made up of three storeys that each nestle into the grassy slope of the hill. The main entrances are located on the middle floor and can be accessed from a staircase that stretches out between the two structures.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

"The two houses attune with the traditional neighbouring buildings," added the architects.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

One of several features intended to create a dialogue with the landscape is the concrete used in the stairwells, which was mixed with stones sourced from nearby mountains.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Curtains were made from locally produced Loden textiles, while furniture comprises a mixture of old and new wooden pieces.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

"Through these choices, aspects of nature are reintroduced to the interior of the house," said the team.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Other details include a timber-framed bookshelf integrated into a wall and a rope that functions as a handrail.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Pedevilla was keen for the houses to be as self-sufficient as possible, so water is sourced from a private well, while electricity and heating are provided by a combination of geothermal, photovoltaic and passive solar energy.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects

Photography is by Gustav Willeit.

La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects
First floor plan – click for larger image
La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects
Penthouse plan – click for larger image
La Padevilla residences by Pedevilla Architects
Cross section – click for larger image
  • Naimit

    Teleport me there now, please.
    However, the open backed bookcase/feature with the drop to the first floor will certainly – no ifs, ands or buts – be witness to piles of books falling onto people’s heads at some point in the future. I can’t abide open backed bookcases where the books only fall out the back a distance of a few feet (which they do, all too often). Other than this admittedly personal pet peeve, I think these are gorgeous residences.

  • Ciar

    Such a beautiful, welcoming, and enchanting exterior. But such a disappointingly lifeless interior. Where is the warmth of the farmhouse?