Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects
slots into a three-metre-wide space

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Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

Boyarsky Murphy Architects sandwiched this glass-fronted family residence between two terraced houses in west London, on a site less than three metres wide at the front.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

Named Sliver House, the narrow residence occupies a site that had formerly housed the stables of a Victorian wine seller, but had been left vacant for decades as a result of its awkward shape.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

"The Sliver House is a unique response to a difficult infill site," said architect Nicholas Boyarsky, one of the two founders of Boyarsky Murphy Architects. "There were no obvious ways to develop it."

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

The architects created a four-storey residence, with one of its floors sunken down to the meet the lower ground level at the rear of the site.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

As the site widens towards the back, they were able to create a rectilinear block with a secluded rear terrace and garden.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

The translucent glass frontage helps to bring natural light through the building without compromising residents' privacy. Additional light enters the building through strategically located rear windows and skylights.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

"The guiding principles behind the project were to introduce as much light as possible throughout the building whilst retaining privacy from the many neighbouring windows," said Boyarsky.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

Protruding upper volumes help to increase the floor space on the higher levels, while also allowing different parts of the house to line up with the hotchpotch arrangement of surrounding walls.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

A simple interior layout helps to ensure light permeates every space. The entrance leads through to a living space that occupies the majority of the ground floor, opening out to an enclosed balcony.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

The staircase winds across the plan to suit the layout of each floor. It leads down to a kitchen and dining room on the lowest level, and up to three bedrooms on the two upper floors.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space

Photography is by Hélène Binet.

Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Site plan
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Lower ground floor plan – click for larger image and key
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Ground floor plan – click for larger image and key
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
First floor plan – click for larger image and key
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Second floor plan – click for larger image and key
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Long section one – click for larger image
Sliver House by Boyarsky Murphy Architects slots into a three-metre-wide space
Long section two – click for larger image
  • omnicrom

    That street façade looks cheap. A shame. The rest looks okay. I like the jaunty angles at the back.

  • thatissorad

    I can think of 101 better ways to design this facade…

  • Chris MacDonald

    I’d have to echo the other chaps on here, the street facade isn’t a great addition to the streetscape, though with that in mind I haven’t seen what was there before. Otherwise, what a fantastic piece of design. I love projects like this that appear to shoehorn a large space into a small one.