Concrete canopy shelters Lund Hagem's Norwegian holiday home from the sea breeze

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This island holiday home designed by Norwegian studio Lund Hagem is sheltered beneath a wide concrete canopy, which bridges the surrounding rocks to frame views to the coast for occupants (+ slideshow).

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

The residence is set within a protected spot on the shore of Lyngholmen, an island off Norway's southern coast.

Already naturally sheltered from the the wind by boulders and dense vegetation, Cabin Lyngholmen is further protected against the strong sea breezes by a thick white concrete roof.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

The 2.7-centimetre-thick slab folds up from the rocks and over the residence, and is supported by a series of steel columns.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

"The key feature of the house is the roof that bridges across the existing rocks," explained the architects. "It does not only shelter the immediate outdoor space from wind but also articulates the view towards the ocean from the house."

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

"The roof provides a smooth white surface, creating an interesting dialogue with the rocky landscape, and gives the cabin its distinctive character," they added.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

White concrete, glass and ash were selected as the primary construction materials to help harmonise the structure with the pale tones already present around the site.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

All the rooms had to fit within the 100-square-metre footprint of a 1960s cottage that previously stood on the site. Due to ground level differences, the residence is split into two wings and connected by an outdoor terrace.



This helps to maximise the usable floor area and provides each room with its own separate entrance.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

The main wing sits closest to the shore and contains an open-plan sitting room and kitchen, as well as a master bedroom. Children's bedrooms, a guest suite and study are housed in the second block, which features sections of ash cladding.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

A staircase connects a large white concrete terrace beside the living space with the wooden deck to the rear.

Inside, a fireplace and long bench are constructed from the same white concrete as the roof, and ash wood details are stained white.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

The island is accessible only by boat, so the main entrance is positioned facing the main jetty. A path links the house with a private beach, where a new jetty extends around a rocky outcrop.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

Lights set within bollards illuminate the trail to the water to welcome those arriving from the sea.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand

This is the third seaside holiday home by Lund Hagem we have featured on Dezeen. All three are set on islands off Norway’s southern coast and are constructed primarily from concrete – the first has a stepped concrete roof that doubles as a viewing platform and the second is anchored to its rocky setting by slender stilts.

Photography is by Lund Hagem.

Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand
Location plan – click for larger image
Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand
Site and floor plan – click for larger image
Cabin Lyngholmen by Lundhagem Lillesand
Section – click for larger image
  • Natalia

    I love it, honestly I can’t stop looking at this design!

  • Filippo De Francesco

    Very John Lautner-ish, sleek!

  • Thomas

    Why use concrete when you don’t have to? The design is OK, but not great. In Norway there are strict restrictions on building this close to the water, but when you’re rich – like the owners of this building are – you can get almost anything through planning apparently.

    Also, this cabin doesn’t look very Norwegian. Where is the connection to place? I see none of that.

  • Manky

    That is darn stunning.

  • bwd

    27 centimetres.

  • Nunzio

    Gorgeous.