Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk builds "labyrinth-like" concrete home in Norway
Tags:

Search results:

Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk completes "labyrinth-like" concrete home in Norway

External staircases connect the three stories of this cast-concrete house overlooking a lake in Norway by architect Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk (+ slideshow).

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Tommy Andresen

Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS Arkitektkontor built the family home, named Concrete House, in the Stange region. It sits on the eastern shore of Mjøsa, the largest lake in Norway.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Rickard Riesenfeld

The Norwegian studio cast the concrete in place to create cantilevered staircases, terraces and a covered carport that add complexity to the rectilinear concrete structure of the three-storey family home.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Tommy Andresen

"We wanted to achieve the kind of labyrinth-like qualities you sometimes find in old estate houses," said Hølmebakk. "The kind where children can explore the many staircases, rooms and hallways, and where there is enough space for teeming life to unfold."

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Nils Petter Dahle

Landings and terraces jut out from the upper floors to provide outdoor seating areas that connect with two exterior staircases.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Rickard Riesenfeld

One flight of steps connects the first-floor kitchen with the ground to act as the main entrance to the house, while a second runs between the sun deck of the master bedroom and the first-floor sitting room.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Rickard Riesenfeld

"This adds to a visually complex pattern of movement within a rationally executed spatial organisation," said the architect.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Nils Petter Dahle

The irregular placement of horizontal and vertical windows across the facade gives the illusion of a split-level floor plan, even though the building has a simple internal layout.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk

"Although the grand view played an important role in the design, the facade is not fully glazed, but rather 'masked out' with varying openings located in relation to interior spaces and their intended use," explained Hølmebakk.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Nils Petter Dahle

On the interior of the building, the smallest windows have faceted surrounds that narrow to form slits of glazing on the facade, while the largest translate to the interior space as floor-to-ceiling glazing.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Rickard Riesenfeld

A picture window inserted in the wall above the kitchen stove frames a lake vista.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk

"We were fascinated by the idea of the view acting as framed images, with motifs changing with weather and season and as you move through the house," added the architect.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Nils Petter Dahle

Bedrooms and living areas face the lake, while the bathrooms and utility areas occupy the more enclosed rear and ground floor of the building.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Nils Petter Dahle

A stairwell rises through the centre of the first floor to an open-plan living and kitchen area. Two lightwells cut through to the floor above, creating double-height spaces in the sitting area and the kitchen, and a lower ceiling over the stairwell.

To the rear of the house, a spiral staircase leads to the top floor where three bedrooms are arranged along the front.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Tommy Andresen

The ground floor of the property is given over to a guest suite, cellars and a carport.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Tommy Andresen

"The budget, which in the beginning was quite generous, allowed for solutions and principles one normally finds hard to use," added the architect.

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Photograph by Tommy Andresen

"Stairs need not be placed above each other, rooms could span two floors, and openings for daylight and views could be tailored to the different specific uses within the house," he added.


Project credits:
Architect: Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk, architect
Team: Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk (PL), Rickard Riesenfeld
Consultants: Sweco (structural engineer), Finn-Erik Nilsen (special structural consultant), Aalerud Hamar (HVAC), IBR elprosjekt (electro)
Main performing concrete contractor: Morten Grønvold AS
Concrete supplier: Betong Øst AS
Mural work: Asle R. Larsen
Exterior doors and windows: Profilteam Hamar AS
Interior doors: Nyhuset bruk
Furnishing/Carpenter: Aagaards snekkerverksted

Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Site plan – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
First floor plan – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Second floor plan – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Long section one – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Long section two – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Cross section one – click for larger image
Concrete House in Stange by Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk
Cross section two – click for larger image