Nihilism clothing by DZHUS can be folded into different austere shapes
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Nihilism clothing by DZHUS can be folded into different austere shapes

Womenswear brand DZHUS is continuing its reputation for austere and architecturally precise garments with the Nihilism collection, designed for the "crazy rhythm of modern life".

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

The range features tops and trousers with distinctive angular shapes and folds, as well as coats with dramatically pointed hoods. The clothes are designed as basic pieces that are easy to unzip and unfold, offering different options for wearers.

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

"Everything we use nowadays has to be functional, compact and mobile to help us cope with the crazy rhythm of modern life," said Ukrainian founder Irina Dzhus, who launched the label in 2010.

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

The collection is made from felted knit, denim and cotton – chosen to reflect the industrial design of the clothes. Dzhus selected felt textures reminiscent of concrete – her "great passion" – and cotton, as it's often used in workers' uniforms.

The garments feature raw edges and exposed seams. Piping extends beyond the fabric to double as cords.

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

Previous collections created by DZHUS have been similarly functional and angular. The 2013 Overground range included concrete cuffs, and the 2015 collection featured garments made from folded felt – designed to reference 20th-century Totalitarianism.

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

"At the beginning of my career, my collections were pure avant-garde and pretty much costume-like," said the designer, who was approached by stylists from the film series The Hunger Games.

DZHUS' Nihilism collection is designed for the “crazy rhythm of modern life”

"I clearly realised I'd always wanted to do fashion but not costumes," she added. "The more I developed my skills, the deeper did I realise that creating extravagant show pieces was just the easiest and the laziest way to embody my concepts."

"I preferred more exquisite methods – and making my conceptual cut totally wearable at the same time."

Photography is by Olga Nepravda.


Project credits:

Styling: Irina Dzhus
Makeup and hair: Maria Kolomiets
Models: Sofi Pashkual at PM Management and Inna Daukshene