Lendager Group uses recycled materials to build Copenhagen townhouses
Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

Lendager Group uses recycled materials to build 20 townhouses in Copenhagen

Recycled concrete, repurposed double-glazing and discarded flooring boards were all used in the construction of Upcycle Studios, a Copenhagen housing development designed by Lendager Group.

Danish architecture studio Lendager Group built the series of 20 new townhouses in the Ørestad district of Denmark's capital city.

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

All of the wood was sourced from Danish manufacture Dinesen, which would otherwise have burned the material, while windows were sourced from old buildings that had been renovated.

Plus a total of 850 tonnes of concrete was cast on site, using refuse from the construction of the Copenhagen Metro.

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

"To solve the climate crisis, we need to develop not only sustainable but regenerative solutions,"  said Lendager Group, which aims to promote a circular economy across its architecture projects.

"Upcycle Studios shows how we can decouple growth from emissions by looking at waste as a resource. We can build sustainable buildings without having to compromise on quality, aesthetics or price."

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

To the street, each long, thin house presents a large glazed facade with a geometric wooden frame, looking into a double-height reception space.

A protruding first floor cuts into this to create a small mezzanine, while a second-floor bedroom space cantilevers out slightly, creating a contrasting wood-clad sawtooth profile along the run of houses.

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

The diagonal orientation of each home become more apparent at the rear, where the staggered formation is emphasised by thick concrete walls separating each property.

Between these dividing walls sit each house's driveway, as well as a garage, below a large window into the living spaces above.

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

"The houses are designed to be spacious and to help promote sustainable living, creating a good indoor climate and making sharing easier," said the architecture studio.

"Some areas can be used as offices and others as rental accommodation, or for workshops and other user-defined needs."

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

Roof gardens and solar panels add the potential for the houses to be self-sufficient, helping to allow for a "circular" way of life in tune with the building, which the architects hope residents will adopt.

"Upcycle Studios potentially reduces the total Co2 emissions over 50 years by about 60 per cent," Lendager Group added. "This not only makes it the circular home of tomorrow – it also becomes a pioneer housing project with a design that incentivises sustainable living."

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials

Lendager Group recently revealed plans for a 35,000 square metre eco village in Ørestad South, also in Copenhagen, after winning a competition with Årstiderne Arkitekter.

Photography is by Rasmus Hjortshøj for COAST.


Project credits:

Partner in charge: Anders Lendager
Project manager: Jesper Højbjerg
Lendager team: Anette Orth Laybourm, Mathias Ruø Rasmussen, Nicholas Ransome, Niklas Nolsøe, Iben Nørkjær, Torben Vestergaard, Sunniva Garshol, Signe Balthazar Munk
Engineers: MOE
Client: NREP

More images and plans

Lendager Group design Upcycle Studios in Denmark built from recycled materials
Floor plan