LALALA Arthotel in Sopot

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The LALALA hotel in Sopot, Poland, has seven rooms designed by seven different artists.

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The artists involved in the project were Jakub Rebelka, Iwona Cybula, Asia Piascik, Marek Mielnicki, Emilia Bartkowska, Patrycja Orzechowsk, Kuba Bakowski, Honorata Martin, Ula Wasielewska, Joanna Zastrozna.

Top image: Nr 38, designed by Honorata Martin, Ula Wasielewska.
Above: Nr 77, designed by Asia Piascik.

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More Dezeen stories about hotels with rooms designed by artists:

The Pixel Hirschgasse by Thomas Feichtner
Art Suites at Icehotel

Above: Nr 100, designed by Emilia Bartkowska.

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Above: Nr 7, designed by Marek Mielnicki.

Here's some more information from Lalala:

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LALALA: bistro-bar-guest house-wine house.

In short - a hybrid, a place for mavericks who look for a charming, airy space, infiltrating calmly into their bloodstreams, pulsing delicately. Before your eyes there appears a tenement with a wooden patio, a little idyllic garden and a hammock, slightly out of the way, where time flows in another rhythm.

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An original reshuffle of styles and forms, of wine, wine and wine; genuinely smiling and imaginative service, informal vibe and a unique, not only as for Tricity, arthotel with rooms created by artists…

Above: Nr 295, designed by Kuba Bakowski.

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The threshold welcomes us with kitsch golden cats, straight from China, lamps made of tubes bought for a song, draped into a designer object of desire, a black piano in the corner, crystal chandelier over the bar interspersed with origami figures; a little altar paved with arabesque tiles takes us to Alhambra.

Above: Nr 100, designed by Emilia Bartkowska.

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A blend - or mélange if you wish: the multicoloured and unusual personalities of the owners are manifested on every step. Children love this place, as by coming here they enter the Wonderland in quest of colourful treasures and sounds of hidden musical boxes.

Above: Nr 1600, designed by Patrycja Orzechowska.

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The kitchen serves creative dishes, concocted to order from high-quality products. We especially recommend the goat cheese salad, lalala-made ice cream, hot chocolate cake with chilli - a fantastic aphrodisiac, and our one of a kind home-made burger with brie for carnivores.

Above: Nr 7, designed by Marek Mielnicki.

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Lalala means also an exceptional vision of sit downs and spontaneous/unpredictable actions, such as jam sessions out of the blue, exhibitions, dancing parties or performances. Here you will not be exposed to clubbing pushing-and-shoving, never-ending queues to the loo, nor loud beat.

Above: Nr 100, designed by Emilia Bartkowska.

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Instead, you may unexpectedly discover alternative works of art or take part in a merry street action, practice yoga in Hopla, participate in "Sporty Sunday", togs' day (i.e. duds exchange) or wine tasting.

Above: Nr 77, designed by Asia Piascik.

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In summer the patio smells sweet with herbs, a hammock is hung, talks resound and there is much fun and laughter. A cat nuzzles and Asia’s mare comes to art exhibitions.

Above: Nr 295, designed by Kuba Bakowski.

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Everything for gourmands, fondlings, hedonists and experts in beautiful time-wasting. A rich mixture of forms.

Above: Nr 38, designed by Honorata Martin, Ula Wasielewska.

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7 rooms, 7 stories, 7 tastes going frisky on the eye, 7 spick-and-span artistic concepts, a conspiracy of free minds and imaginations, a wonderful alternative, hotel-nonhotel - no doubts an arthotel, Mecca of impression collectors, and for dessert - a Moresque apartment a la Zastrozna, i.e. a designer Bakhchisaray in foamy, marine Sopot..

Above: Nr 38, designed by Honorata Martin, Ula Wasielewska.

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Welcome to the eclectic flea market of bliss of seven faces. Artistic souls often carouse here, rooms are packed with people, conversations and lights, cats come and go.

Above: Pokój nr 7, designed by Marek Mielnicki.

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The bar smells of coffee, cake and good wine, children pop in for dumplings and ice cream, good cheeses melt on the tip of your tongue and in summer an idle guest rocks in the hammock. Each room is a different novel, different world.

Above: Nr 1600, designed by Patrycja Orzechowska.

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Above: Nr 77, designed by Asia Piascik

Nr 44
Designed by Jakub Rebelka, Iwona Cybula
That obscure object of desire and a furry-woody baroque surprise... Dreamy thicket, generator of difficult dreams, inspiration for naughty children. Here a strange narration is taking place - about crime, forbidden delight, a forest outing with no end, being lost in dreams; the Little Red Riding Hood meets the Wolf, sticking out her tongue at him and showing him the finger... The wall is adorned with blood-red and black mural by Jakub Rebelka and red antlers from Mr. Zastrozny’s collection. The furniture has been picked up and the wall covered with a pitch-black (obviously artificial) pelt by Iwonka. Time for cuddles. Dripping crystals, antler-hangers, the door bears a black knocker in form of a male cherub and the gate to another dimension is guarded by two ravens and an owl. The overall ambience is oneiric, erotic and criminal…

Nr 77
Designed by Asia Piascik
Calm, soothing, yet perverse. Ballet-dancers on the wall paper dance during the day, and at night - well-lit - rest and fall asleep, rub their feet, sigh… And dream of… robots, as the side table, instead of a TV set, bears "Mortal Engines" by Stanislaw Lem and Duchamp’s biography. A collection of hangers from the Berlin flea market and a lonely, fragrant orange that likes to roll welcome you at the door. The bed twirls on ballet-dancers' feet, against the immortal dog-tooth check tiles. A silent rebel of turquoise, black and white, mute kingdom of dog-tooth check. There swings a very large dog-tooth check lamp shade and the body falls asleep lightly in a starched bed linen. For dreamers.

Pokój nr 7
Designed by Marek Mielnicki
Charm, foam, whale and pistol. Welcome to white and blue free variation. A mural on the wall - a girl swings with a pistol, a little airplane scorches along, a whale lazes about, water splashes. Hegemony of white. You can almost hear that purl of dripping water. It’s a delicately whipped, soothing foam. Like marshmallows and down. Sparing dosage of forms, reasonable design. A shadow is cast by a counterpoint black crystal chandelier. A mental, joyful seclusion. A trinket, time to exhale, splashdown of post-modernistic magic.

Nr 100
Designed by Emilia Bartkowska
Surrealistic paradise of surprises. Arabesques, cackle of plastic turkeys, playing hop-scotch on a pink floor. The cloud wardrobe and golf ball table have also been invited. In the corner there laughs a rattling doll. Black rain drips from the cloud and crystals onto a pipe-puffing whale. In the black polka dot bathroom eccentric hairdos and photo sessions are created – ferment and inspiration. Two beds for bed hopping, two windows for opening, a mixture of harmoniously combined colours. You can taste the flavour of a milk-shake, bubble gum and aniseed sweets. For grownup children.

Nr 1600
Designed by Patrycja Orzechowska
Retromania with a beating heart. Snake plants in large pots guard tall windows. You lie down on an old-English, thoroughly renovated beds. Classic reading-books: "The Locomotive" and Bergman’s "Scenes from a Marriage". On the table - a retrogramophone along with old vinyl albums of Lionel Richie and "Disco Lights". Time for dances and pirouettes. Velvet, Lynch-style curtains are pierced with a paper-and-safety-pin invasion of newspaper cut-out figures. On the walls - circular-red, energizing ornaments with black rays of light. Passionate eclecticism, a result of numerous rummages. Ablutions recommended in the red and black lustrous bathroom.

Nr 295
Designed by Kuba Bakowski
Heterogeneous world. A bit of a mystery and castling. Pink folk cutouts, salvaged socrealstic armchairs, a wooden bed based on legs made from cut old-Chinese columns, recaptured Chinese thermos - pink, with roses; reading matter of the insane under arm. Somewhat classic, somewhat retro, somewhat a grandma’s lounge, somewhat-somewhat. Yet the bed is fit for antics or idleness, sub-duvet and subliminal reshuffles. The body will have time to rest beautifully. Time goes by slowly. You may sip on a glass of wine, burn your tongue with strong tea, nibble on sweet home-made pastry from the bar. For long lazy Sundays with breakfast in bed.

Nr 38
Designed by Honorata Martin, Ula Wasielewska
The land of Mrs Roe-Deer and imps. On the chest of drawers a pair of silver stilettos for ladies or gentlemen - for tap-dancing, dances and beating out rhythms at nights. Wood and nude azure, mosaic and crystal. Curtains embroidered with frisky giraffes. The whole world dashes along those curtains. Honorata peeps from her self-portrait, combined with naïve drawings. The room has its fairy and protector. The walls glisten with Ulcia's collages and vermicules. An interwar bed heavily serves dreams of an idyllic village. Next to it there stands an arabesque chaise longue intended for quick day sleeps and reading sessions. A place for gourmets, perfect for drinking cordial from crystal glasses, accompanied with raisin halva. The land of Hrabal.

Apartament
Designed by Joanna Zastrozna
Lemony-orangey bomb with salvaged furniture and designer gems. Recalls lullaby Arabian mosaic nights. The Sopot vision of designer Bakhchisaray composed of many blocks. A place of light invasion and multitude of balconies. In the backstage there dashes the Tricity version of the Tube - local train. The crown of our arthotel, the citrusy maraschino cherry, the bathroom like a post-modernistic Alhambra. Laziness becomes a habit. But so do rave-ups. Here you can shape your body at Hopla. And regenerate it. Suspending your body at altitudes and an attempt of levitation. Recommended to moon-walkers.

  • http://www.designplaygrounds.com Rodrigo Medina

    Very interesting interior designs this project reminds me a lot of the fox hotel at copenhagen http://www.hotelfox.dk/

  • Arvin Rodrigues

    Its a gread idea to have different designers conceptualise different areas of the same space.The final product has an interesting effect -like venturing into a completely diferent “world” on entering each room.
    I wonder however if there can be a clash of styles that does not suit the space.
    I am personally inclined toward the more classical style of interior design and I could imagine that some of the styles displayed in this project, could be too different from mine, producing an unplesant final product.
    any opinions or personal experiences?

  • http://wael-design.blogspot.com Francois Beydoun

    Hahaha…
    It is a nice way to have nightmares…

    Francois Beydoun

  • ness

    cool designs …
    bad use of camera lens

  • mcmlxix

    If only the rooms, funishings, grain and light patterns actually did have those fish-eye curves. That would be something.

  • Clark

    I think the photography confuses the rooms designs and make it difficult to get a sense of the space.

  • bartek

    Alice in Wonderland Hotel!

  • Malgosia

    it looks awesome!

  • http://www.zetaarquitectos.blogspot.com nicolas

    congratulation, the proyect is beatiful!!

  • marc libur

    there should be a rule against wide angle lens for interior documentary. otherwise the project looks good. i would like to stay in any of the rooms and imagine myself to fit that world. very escapist.

  • http://www.joannazastrozna.com.pl as

    hmmm…ZAPRASZAMY:)nad morze:)

  • jc

    coll ideas, but i agree, misrepresented by the strange lense choice

  • http://tony-fromhere.blogspot.com tony harding

    This sort of concept is always interesting but as so often happens the result disappoints for no other reason than everyone seems to be trying too hard. It happens in tennis; cricket & golf. You put an enormous effort into thrashing the ball into eternity and you find it catching the edge of the racket. being driven into the ground or missing it altogether. When the effort is evident the point, in my opinion, has been missed.

  • klejdi eski

    Trainspotting ! :-)