Les Ti’Canailloux by Topos Architecture

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French studio Topos Architecture have completed a nursery in Nantes where the gabled ends are clad in red polycarbonate, engraved with floral patterns.

Called Les Ti’Canailloux, the project features larch cladding that blends the gabled structures with perimeter walls and encloses a playground.

Photographs are by Patrick Miara.

Here's some more more information from the architects:


The nursery is located in Nantes, on a woody parcel of 700 m2, at the corner of two streets, in a residential area. The Architects opted for an original urban building, in harmony with the district. In this way, the nursery is based on a jewellery box: the high volumes seem to come unfolded from an initial central volume. It looks like a big house.

Constructive system:

The nursery was designed in order to give, at the building’s back, a protected and quiet children’s garden with trees.

The main building material is the wood (European Larch). It is used for the frame, the vertical cladding and the roof.

It entirely covers the building. The Larch was processed without chemicals, but with an innovative technology based on old times techniques: “Oléothermie”.

The wood is impregnated with vegetables oils that have proprieties against fungus.

The two gables are covered by chiselled and coloured “Polycarbonate”, according to a new process. With this technique, the “Polycarbonate” soaks up the light. It accentuates the modern looking of the building.

Programme: conception and construction of a day nursery “Les Ti’Canailloux”

Click for larger image

Location: Nantes (44) - France
Surface: 350 m2
Children in the nursery: 30
Project owner: Association “Les Ti’Canailloux”

  • Matt

    Interior photo of the ‘”accentuation of light” would have been nice

  • http://www.gebaracad.com Jean-Pierre Gebara

    surely not a NURSERY
    nothing but the introverted scheme. otherwise, the volume, material, function…. doesnt reflect a kids nuresey

  • Rouan

    Why is the floorplan drawn as though the house is constructed out of masonry?

  • Francois

    well, it looks quite impressif for french architecture full of this crazy regulations… congratulation TOPOS !

  • http://www.gebaracad.com JP

    congrats????
    cmmon wake up francois what is there in this project?

  • idealist

    i think this is quite nice, and surely a NURSERY. I’d send my kids there, and they’d probably love it (the space anyway…)

    i find the material palette has a simple warmth and tactility. And the volumes are well-scaled, playful, but not ostentatious.

    and as for introverted, i’m more comfortable having my kids play in a safe place away from the street. actually, i find this scheme strikes a nice balance with its street presence.

    i would have inset the polycarbonate surfaces by 6″ to give a nice shadow line and emphasize the folding of the form. i hope the larch has some longevity and the details are good…

  • http://NA Oofi d’Oeuf

    I just don’t get it. I can only imagine that the neighbors don’t get it either or would just prefer the building was more neighborhood friendly. If the landscaping calls for a climbing vine to filter out the sun so the wood does not bleach out unevenly and provides a “green” solution for energy conservation, then I applaud the design team. If I may, I recommend an oriental vine commonly referred in America as Kudzu (broad leaves, open undercarriage allowing air to flow freely, and a rather significant growth per calendar year). Afterall, the kids enjoy natural beauty over manmade any day. Remember, this is not only for the neighborhood but primarily for the children, not for adults and certainly not for parents. Ask the kids for their opinion if they are of an age suitable for reasoning and communication of feelings. Track graduates to find out how they fare in upper level schools.

  • http://NA Oofi d’Oeuf

    Amendment: would love to see a detail of roof construction that addresses rainwater runoff. I have never seen a working roof built this way. After a life of 20 years, how is the roof replaced?

    • Amanda

      I have no idea.
      Why don't you come and show me? ;)