Snøhetta completes phase one
of Times Square transformation

| 6 comments
Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation

News: architecture firm Snøhetta has concluded the first phase of a major overhaul of New York's Times Square, continuing the initiative started in 2009 to pedestrianise large sections of the popular tourist destination.

The $55 million reconstruction project is the largest redesign of the square in decades and encompasses the transformation of five public plazas between 42nd and 47th Streets, which will be entirely reconstructed to remove any traces that vehicular traffic once ran through the square along the Broadway.

Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation
Rendering by Snohetta and MIR

Snøhetta completed the redevelopment of the plaza between 42nd and 43rd Streets just in time for the New Year's Eve celebrations. It features flattened-out curbs that create single-level surfaces for pedestrians, as well as new benches and paving surfaces.

Working alongside engineers Weidlinger Associates and landscape architect Mathews Nielsen, the architects plan to open a second plaza by the end of 2015 and complete the entire project the following year.

Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation
Rendering by Snohetta

This stretch of the Broadway was first closed to traffic in 2009 as part of an initiative by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg to provide additional space for more than 400,000 pedestrians who pass through Times Square every day. Since then the square has seen a 33 percent reduction in traffic-related injuries, as well a 180 percent increase in shop lets around the square.

"Since we first introduced temporary pedestrian plazas in Times Square, we have seen increased foot traffic and decreased traffic injuries - and businesses have seen more customers than ever," said Bloomberg. "With more than 400,000 pedestrians passing through Times Square every day, the plazas have been good for New Yorkers, our visitors, and our businesses - and that's why we're making them permanent."

Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation

Once complete, the restructuring will add 13,000 square-metres (140,000 square-feet) of new pedestrian space to Times Square. It will feature ten solid granite benches, as well as two-tone paving slabs with embedded metal discs, designed to reflect the neon glow from surrounding signs and billboards.

"With innovative designs and a little paint, we've shown you can change a street quickly with immediate benefits," said transportation commissioner Sadik-Khan.

Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation
Mayor Bloomberg at the ribbon-cutting ceremony

The project is one of 59 new public squares under development across the city initiated by Bloomberg. Various other public realm improvements have also taken place in the city in recent years, including the introduction of a cycle-hire scheme and the continuing extension of the elevated High Line park.

Snøhetta completes phase one of Times Square transformation
Site plan - click for larger image
  • R

    Not a single bee…

  • Ny

    I hope there will be clean public bathrooms, and if they don’t maintain and clean the phone booths, get rid of them!

  • Guttergoat

    Times Square is one of the most crowded artificial environments in the world, I personally don’t have a problem with Snøhetta’s design not having any trees.

  • IVG

    The pedestrianization of the Times Square is one of the best things that have happened in NY. It shows another scale and demonstrates that spaces full of people is an attraction to others.

  • Reclaimer

    Funny how this article doesn’t mention the involvement of Gehl Architects at all.

    Not that they had much to do with the final execution, but they were the original brain behind the transformation.

    http://www.gehlarchitects.com/#/378166/

    http://www.gehlarchitects.dk/files/projects/100125_NYC_4page_CVD_ENG.pdf

    Just thought I’d mention for anyone who’s interested.

  • http://www.dezeen.com/ Dezeen Magazine

    Yes you’re right, we’ve amended the text to make that clearer. Amy/Dezeen