rAndom International at Spazio Krizia

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rAndom International at Spazio Krizia

Milan update: rAndom International showed a new collection of lights made from cannibalised electronic equipment at Spazio Krizia.

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Showing alongside Ingo Maurer, they also displayed their Temporary Printing Machine, which "prints" a pattern onto light-sensitive film using ultra-violet light.

Below are product descriptions from rAndom International:

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Lost light (above) by rAndom International 2007 (S. Wood, F. Ortkrass, H. Koch)

Dismantled Thin Film Transistor Display, Laser Cut Stainless Steel, Apple Macintosh Computer

The Lost Light is the first of a number of projects that were the result of investigating and de-constructing off-the-shelf Thin Film Transistor (TFT) displays. Using the 4 displays to control the quality of the light itself instead of backlighting them, a whole range of possibilities will be explored, including the commissioning of dedicated video content for the Lost Light.

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Found light (above) - rAndom International 2007 (S. Wood, F. Ortkrass, H. Koch)

Brightness Enhancement Film (BEF) from Thin Film Transistor Display, Laser Cut Stainless Steel

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Found Light is the simple sibling of Lost, and made of a material that again was found while investigating and de-constructing off-the-shelf Thin Film Transistor (TFT) displays. Originally used in those displays to enhance the viewing angle, around the light source it doubles, distorts and ultimately enhances the experience of the light.

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Morse Light (above) - rAndom International 2007 (S. Wood, F. Ortkrass, H. Koch)

Blown Glass Sphere, Silicone Tubing, Water, pigment, Air Pump

Where does decoration stop, and disgust start? Morse is a first of a series of rAndom International Water Light Installations, which will ultimately result in the display of digital images and text with coloured water and air. Controlled with one pump only,Morse continously sends out a neverending stream of tangible morse code in the form of coloured water impulses. These travel through 300 ft of tube, giving the impression of a state of ants within the light.

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Temporary Printing Machine MKI (above) - rAndom International 2007 (S. Wood, F. Ortkrass, H. Koch)

(Light reactive paint, aircraft-grade aluminium frame, Festo components, electronic UV print head, proprietary software, Apple Macintosh Computer).

The Temporary Printing Machine are pieces about our relationship towards consuming information. Highlighting the ephemeral quality of digital data, the installation invites the viewer to witness the creation and almost immediate decay of digital content. The machine travels over a big canvas onto which digital content is “printed" out as a monochrome image.

The images, patterns and text however are not printed with ink, but with UV light onto a light reactive surface which allows the content to stay visible for about one minute.
Once the information has faded away, the printing process can be repeated, creating an infinite stream of appearing and disappearing data.

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See all dezeen's coverage of Milan 2007 here

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Posted on Wednesday, April 25th, 2007 at 3:16 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.