Front dinner at Nordic Light Hotel

| 5 comments

Stockholm Design Week: Swedish design group Front have sent us some photos taken at the "speed-dating" dinner they held at the Nordic Light Hotel in Stockholm last Wednesday.

The dinner, held in the hotel lobby which also hosted an installation by Front, was attended by around 60 designers, architects, journalists, politicians, students and friends from around the world.

Attendees, who were served typical Swedish delicacies in tiny glasses, became part of a performance devised by Front and had to change seats every three minutes in order to meet as many other guests as possible.

Guests included Giulio Cappellini, Teruo Kurosaki, Thomas Sandell, Inga Sempé, Libby Sellers, Stephen Burks, Satyendra Pakhalé and Katrin Olina.

The dinner was hosted by Dezeen editor-in-chief Marcus Fairs.

It was followed by a party attended by around 700 people (see photos of the party on the Nordic Light Hotel's website).

| 5 comments

Posted on Saturday, February 9th, 2008 at 10:40 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • john

    wow. a self-congratulatory celebration of the design’s community’s most overrated.
    amazing.

  • pah

    dezeen should really stick to showing design and not showing fancy party guests… no?!

  • m

    well, pah, in a way they are showing where the designs start from – people that is. and ideas get better if they run through many heads.

    good idea marcus, speed dating is rather popular theme these days.

  • Everyone’s a Critic

    Marcus, what would be really nice is some analysis of the event– not just documentation of what happened, but WHY it’s important, and WHAT it was a catalyst for. Honestly, many posts on Dezeen would be so much more useful if the time was taken to critique or analyze what was being reported upon…

  • pah

    well, m, of course design gets deeper by discourse; but barely watching people speed-dating doesn’t help anyone. i have to agree with “Everyone’s critic”, it lacks deeper information.