60Bag by Katarzyna Okinczyc and
Remigiusz Truchanowicz

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Polish designer Katarzyna Okinczyc and photographer Remigiusz Truchanowicz have designed the 60Bag, a carrier-bag that degrades in 60 days.

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60Bags are made of non-woven, flax-viscose fabric, produced with flax fiber from industrial waste.

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This technology makes the bags naturally decompose in about 60 days after being discarded by the user.

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The bags can be composted or safely burnt, which means they don’t require expensive recycling processes.

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More information on the project website.

Here's some text from the designers:

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60BAGs are biodegradable carrier bags made out of flax-viscose non-woven fabric. It is a Polish made, scientifically developed and patented material. The flax-viscose fabric is produced with flax fiber industrial waste, which means it doesn’t exploit any natural resources and minimizes the production energy use. This highly innovative technology makes the bags naturally decompose in about 60 days after being discarded by the user. The bags can be composted or safely burnt, which means they don’t require expensive recycling processes.  They are the perfect natural answer to the environment’s needs.

60BAGs are available in different shapes and sizes to fit customer’s needs. They are the breakthrough answer to polypropylene-made “green bags” and to thick plastic bags given away by most clothing retailers. 60BAG is a great commercial opportunity for the companies truly supporting the eco-friendly lifestyle.

The people behind the project are product designer Katarzyna Okinczyc and photographer Remigiusz Truchanowicz.

Katarzyna Okinczyc born in Poland, graduated from the Universitaet der Kuenste in Berlin, Germany. After a 2 year work experience in the United States returned to Poland to work independently and search for new exciting project opportunities with bannerina, dogenvol and 60bag as the result.

Remigiusz Truchanowicz, professional photographer and brand specialist, graduated from Academy of fine art in Poznan, Poland. His work includes art and commercial photography as well as branding practices. Owner of the Devon Visual Group studio.

  • modular

    I like it. It’s cool and trendy and if it really works it’s great.

  • Brett

    Wow this is great. If you look on their website they also have quite an array of different sizes and shapes.

    I wonder how much more expensive they are than regular paper bags?

  • Tyler.

    bardzo spoko!

  • Tweetertweet

    I wonder about the ecological impact of producing these bags. Since they degrade, you’ll have to keep producing them.
    It would be more eco-friendly to use a more sustainable bag in stead of a new one every 60 days.

  • Tyler

    Don’t you think we should stop focusing on the idea of disposable items period and work on creating durable, long lasting products that can be used for years?

  • Nakul

    @ Tyler (Don’t you think we should stop focusing on the idea of disposable items period and work on creating durable, long lasting products that can be used for years?)

    We already have these “durable, long lasting products” – they’re called Polythene bags…and I’d like to ask you: How many times do you actually re-use a polythene bag ? Don’t you think it’d be better that they dispose of themselves rather than lie in some drawer for months and years on end ?
    That’s why I really like 60Bag and find it to be a really innovative idea which, if brought into mass use, could really help our environment. Kudos to Katarzyna and Remigiusz.

  • b

    Tyler, tweetertweet,..
    I think we should focus one duarable and disposable products and a hole other stuf
    I assume these bags can be used over and over but as soon as they end up on the trashbelt of in the gutter they will dissolve some how.
    a bio degradable bag is not a bad idea
    a biodegradable sofa has less priority.
    but also long lasting products end up in the trash one day…

  • tweetertweet

    What we should focus on is awareness and mentality rather than designing biodegradable bags. I think this material is a good development, but perhaps a better function could be found for it?

  • laura

    The bags start to biodegrade after being thrown away!
    There are so many bags people throw away without recycling that having bags that you actually can trash without consequences is great!
    Plus they make them out of industrial waste right?

  • rossvon

    LOVE The bag and the fabric.

    However is it really that Green?
    Consider this:

    If a retailer doesn’t sell enough stock in the 60 days they are stuck with a pile of decomposed bags. Thus causing them to have to order smaller quantities more often and reduce their back stock. This would not only be rather irritating for floor staff. Who will no doubt have to explain why they have no bags for customers. But also drive up costs on transport and call to order.

    The extra emissions alone of the delivery truck neutralize the effect of the bags green footprint.

    But not a bad concept….would like to hear more about it.

  • tom

    Great product!

    I only wonder why some people don’t get it that the bags don’t degrade at home after 60 days but the biodegradation process starts on the compost /trash pile first :)

    Keep my fingers crossed for the success of 60BAG!

  • Suen

    agree with Nakul.

    I believe the bag degrades only in soil or water, it won’t degrade into nth in stock room.
    Can’t think of other usage more suitable then instant giveaway bags.
    Using industrial left out is a good idea!

    To the end, “using scraps to make throw-away item which would at once become a rubbish after use is very smart. SCRAP-TO-SCRAP design. We should think more abt these. It echoes with the rule our eco-system does!

    but how much?

  • Suen

    how abt using it for :

    Kitchen towel
    Toilet wiper
    flower packing
    Trash bag
    Shoe box / Gift box packing…
    Flyers…
    Restaurant paper mat
    … well… ammm….anymore? :)