FLKS by Kapteinbolt

| 16 comments

Dutch designers Kapteinbolt have created a collapsible plywood workspace.

Called FLKS, the design features a desk and chair that fold out from two hinged sheets.

The whole arrangement can be folded flat and leaned against a wall when not in use.

Here's some text from Kapteinbolt:

--

FLKS

We like to introduce FLKS (flex), a flexible workplace.
 Just open the panels unfold the table and the chair and put the plug in for light.
The legs from the table and the chair are provided with special designed joints, pull and turn 90°.

The dimensions of the panels are a combination of sizes according to the Modulor of Le Corbusier in combination with the functional human sizes of today. This design is characterized by simplicity, clarity, freedom and space. 
Freedom in using and in arranging this workplace.

The dialogue between the space and furniture, but also the spaciousness of the furniture itself is an important fact. By bringing furniture back to the essence you can create space. The FLKS provides a definition of space. By giving cover to the back and to one of the sides, the FLKS creates a private and comfortable workplace.

A flexible workplace.
The closed panels open in a 90° angle. The workplace is easy to move and usable in any space. 
FLKS is not only a functional piece of furniture, but also a room divider. Several pieces can be arranged into perfect work stations.
The pieces do not only interact with the space in which they find themselves, but also with each other.
With an extra chair it is even a workplace for two.

The various units do not only interact with the space in which they find themselves, but also with each other. One panel at a side and one panel at the back, open or just a frame, provides a safe and homely feeling. This definition provides a safe and private feeling, by giving cover to the back and to one of the sides. This cover can be formed by a closed panel or by just a frame.

Kapteinbolt is a design studio for 2d and 3d design founded by Louwrien Kaptein (interior architect) and Menno Bolt (multimedia designer).

Material: 
poplar/birch plywood/stainless steel

| 16 comments

Posted on Wednesday, January 20th, 2010 at 1:30 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • selfaux

    not so comfortable sitting on it..

  • Dennis

    I’d vbe curious as t how comfortable this is to work at but i love it!

  • dan

    sencillamente genial, muy interesante la inicial……

  • http://jzane.com jzane designs

    Creative idea and a good use of space.

    Unless the desk locks into place… Way too easy for Joe from accounting to lean on the far end and really mess up your desk/day.

  • iain

    this is a simple idea, one that i feel would work well for students. the simple lines, and style of the product is what makes it. well done.

  • http://designplaygrounds.com Rodrigo Medina

    Awesome , I would love to have one of those on my garden so I can go there , to make my blogging on the exterior , great work.

  • Shmuck

    An interesting conecpt dealing with the ever growing issues of work space, and what that actually means. i’m curious to the context of this desk and where it will be used, can it fit in a students house? would you fold it away? what are the bennifits over a standard kitchen or office table? Does the very nature of having a designated workspace make the interchange between “home” and “work” that little bit easir to make?

  • ew

    great attempt…however

    the same could be achieved with much less material.

    seat is only supported by one leg?

    where is the privacy after folded?

  • Richard Serra

    Stunning. Judd comes to mind for me. What is the price for this and where can one order it?

    The aesthetic is just wonderful!

  • alex

    Carthusian monks in Europe figured out a similar contraption inside their cells (see certosa di galluzzo, farneta or calci).

  • http://areyouanevilgenius.blogspot.com evilgenius

    very compelling visual design but if the intent was to move it and set up the work elsewhere, why have it include the walls? plywood can be awful heavy. it might serve a better purpose as part of an actual immovable wall, to save space in living/working areas that are not so large.

  • Roberto

    dutch motto; “It is better to steal something good then to invent something bad”

    take a look; http://www.kapteinbolt.nl

  • Moma

    I’d like to see a person sitting on the desk with a side view. You’d probably need to enter through the hole in the back panel, or if your 6’4 and 220 lbs as I am, would I even fit? To me, the support legs look very scary.

    Interesting idea, but I also don’t understand how the concept for plug-and-play furniture blends well with bulky and heavy plywood.

  • http://www.blacksheepadvertising.com.au Jack

    It’s a nice idea but, my desk has books, print outs and sketches all over it. Oh, and a computer, with cables etc. Where would I put all that stuff when I fold up the workspace?
    A collapsible bag approximately the size of a collapsible workstation, perhaps.

  • Eiler

    all good fun till you lean somewhere wrong, and you’re tangled in wood..

  • mimar cihan

    one table one chair was enough.