If You Build it, They Will Come… by Ben Faga

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If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Royal College of Art graduate Ben Faga is encouraging bees in London to swarm and set up new hives.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Top: Peckham Bait-Hive  (51.47°, -0.05°)
Above: Hackney City Farm Bait-Hive (51.53°, -0.05°)

Called If You Build it, They Will Come… the project involves installing boxes Faga calls bait-hives within five kilometres of an existing hive and using a specially-developed chemical to attract the bees.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Above: Stoke Newington Bait-Hive (51.55°, -0.07°)

Faga mixed this substance from essential oils, beeswax and the pheromones of a queen bee.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Above: Freightliners Farm Bait-Hive (51.56°, -0.07°)

Here's some more information from the designer:


If you build it, they will come…

This project interrogates the border between fear and hope of an event and the prosaic preparations surrounding the possible event. I have created a series of vessels that attract swarming bees, called bait-hives.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Above: Vauxhall City Farm Bait-Hive (51.48°, -0.09°)

The vessels contain a custom designed bee attractant that I have created by taking the queens pheromone and mixing it with various essential oils and beeswax. This mixture attracts bees from up to 5 kilometers, engaging their swarming instinct encouraging them to leave their current hive to take residence in my bait-hives.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

Above and below: on the roof of Rough Luxe hotel (see our earlier story)

In attempts to expand my current apiary, I have set up a network of bait-hive hosts throughout London. The hosts were selected due to their proximity to current beehives, making it very likely that, one day, 20,000+ bees will swarm into the space to inhabit the hive.

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga

This scenario forces the bait-hive hosts to confront their comfort level with this object. Do they want to attract a swarm to their space? Are they excited or scared of the prospect of living so close to a swarm of bees?

If you build it, they will come… by Ben Faga


See also:

.

The Birds, Bats and Bees
by various designers
The Honeycomb Vase 2007
by Studio Libertiny
More
design stories
  • http://www.urbanizr.org urbanizr

    great approach, I am loking forward to taste the first spoon of london-honey, wondering about the flavor of the city.
    question: how much square footage green does a bee need?

  • http://vimeo.com/9679622?hd=1 Pagettypow

    Superb uplifting Bee Rennaissence optimism, I want one!

  • Greenish

    What a brilliant idea, not to mention completely relevant and necessary right now.

  • buzzzzz

    Actually most beekeepers use bait hives so this is not really anything new.

  • Daniel
  • Erick

    nice but please put the box somewhere else

  • Richard

    reminds me of Pushing Daisies!

  • Tim

    Beekeepers up and down the country are doing this. My old man has one in his garden. The noir-ish pictures and fear-factoring hypothesis are confusing and contradictory. A swarm of bees practically bares no risk at all as they have no honey to defend, and there are loads of people inner city beekeepers who on the whole, look much happier than this miserable lot. As for the ‘special formula’, don’t get me started.

  • hello peeps

    why would you want bees to come near you?

  • PeeBee

    Beehive next to hipster, hipster next to beehive… next

  • jody

    is it just me or does anyone else think this is theft?