The Waterhouse at South Bund
by NHDRO

| 24 comments

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Chinese architects NHDRO have transformed this disused Japanese army headquarters in Shanghai into a hotel, maintaining the building's stripped concrete and brick walls while adding a new Corten steel extension on the roof. 

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

The Waterhouse hotel has nineteen rentable rooms spread over four storeys and a roof-terrace looking onto the neighbouring Huangpu River.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Existing features like exposed concrete and brickwork have been left untouched while new circulation has been added.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The windows have been replaced throughout and narrow interior windows installed that provide glimpses between guest's rooms and public spaces such as the reception and the dining hall.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Photography is by Pedro Pegenaute, apart from where otherwise stated.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Here's some more from the architect:


THE WATERHOUSE at South Bund

Boutique Hotel
Shanghai, China

Located by the new Cool Docks development on the South Bund District of Shanghai, the Waterhouse is a four-story, 19-room boutique hotel built into an existing three-story Japanese Army headquarters building from the 1930’s.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

The boutique hotel fronts the Huangpu River and looks across at the gleaming Pudong skyline.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

The architectural concept behind NHDRO’s renovation rests on a clear contrast of what is old and new.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Above: photo is by Tuomas Uusheimo

The original concrete building has been restored while new additions built over the existing structure were made using Cor-Ten steel, reflecting the industrial past of this working dock by the Huangpu River.

NHDRO’s structural addition, on the fourth floor, resonates with the industrial nature of the ships which pass through the river, providing an analogous contextual link to both history and local culture.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

NHDRO was also responsible for the design of the hotel’s interior, which is expressed through both a blurring and inversion of the interior and exterior, as well as between the public and private realms, creating a disorienting yet refreshing spatial experience for the hotel guest who longs for an unique five-star hospitality experience.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The public spaces allow one to peek into private rooms while the private spaces invite one to look out at the public arenas, such as the large vertical room window above the reception desk and the corridor windows overlooking the dining room.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

These visual connections of unexpected spaces not only bring an element of surprise, but also force the hotel guests to confront the local Shanghai urban condition where visual corridors and adjacencies in tight nong-tang’s define the unique spatial flavor of the city.

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO 1

Above: photo is by Derryck Menere, click for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image


The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

The WaterHouse at South Bund by NHDRO

Click above for larger image

THE WATERHOUSE at South Bund
Boutique Hotel
Shanghai, China

Located by the new Cool Docks development on the South Bund District of Shanghai, the Waterhouse is a four-story, 19-room boutique hotel built into an existing three-story Japanese Army headquarters building from the 1930’s. The boutique hotel fronts the Huangpu River and looks across at the gleaming Pudong skyline. The architectural concept behind NHDRO’s renovation rests on a clear contrast of what is old and new. The original concrete building has been restored while new additions built over the existing structure were made using Cor-Ten steel, reflecting the industrial past of this working dock by the Huangpu River. NHDRO’s structural addition, on the fourth floor, resonates with the industrial nature of the ships which pass through the river, providing an analogous contextual link to both history and local culture.

NHDRO was also responsible for the design of the hotel’s interior, which is expressed through both a blurring and inversion of the interior and exterior, as well as between the public and private realms, creating a disorienting yet refreshing spatial experience for the hotel guest who longs for an unique five-star hospitality experience. The public spaces allow one to peek into private rooms while the private spaces invite one to look out at the public arenas, such as the large vertical room window above the reception desk and the corridor windows overlooking the dining room. These visual connections of unexpected spaces not only bring an element of surprise, but also force the hotel guests to confront the local Shanghai urban condition where visual corridors and adjacencies in tight nong-tang’s define the unique spatial flavor of the city.


See also:

.

Story Hotel
by Koncept
Sayama Flats by Schemata Architecture Office The Dovecote Studio by
Haworth Tompkins
  • edward

    What a cool idea to keep portions of the original use exposed as a reminded of the historical nature of the building.

  • david

    Wonderful! So much different things to experience. So many details. I'm in love.

    Does anybody know the manufacturer of the black chairs with the wooden base they have used in the restaurant?

    Greets. d.

    • lee

      was there a few days ago. the orange tags stitched to the back of the chair says "Neri & Hu". i suppose they designed those chairs.

    • cllp

      the black chair is called SOLO Chair under the product line neri&hu, founded and designed by Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu as well <a href="http:// (www.neriandhu.com),” target=”_blank”> <a href="http://(www.neriandhu.com),” target=”_blank”>(www.neriandhu.com), here is

    • x m

      That chair also design by NHDRO,the name is solo chair(neri&hu brand)

  • hide

    Another great "intervention". I like the mirror window idea. Nice hotel!

  • Vic

    Simple intervention, great result.

  • http://www.designstudio210.com {Design Studio 210}

    I love this! the contrast between the old and new feels so right for the moment.-Emphasizing on the elements from the past brings comfort and serenity to the new addition.

  • Loukas

    Now that's beautiful…more similar architecture PLEASE!!!

  • Maarten

    I love it! very raw, yet so detailed. Master piece!

  • Felix

    So many nice parts of the building… and then the rooms themselves are completely underwhelming and boring. The only way you even know you're in the same building is the bare concrete ceiling. What a waste. I know people don't want to sleep next to dusty old brickwork and flaking plaster but there is no attempt to put the rooms in context. Why on earth is the floor varnished pale timber?

  • http://jamesbalston.squarespace.com James Balston

    There's so much to like about this building; the raw industrial textures contrasting with the dazzling white courtyard; the random window arrangement in the courtyard; and of course the subtley beautiful rooms and furnishings. Nothing like my expectation of a Shanghai hotel.

  • ste

    i've spent like 30minutes with just this single post… normally i spent like 5minutes for everything new to dezeen every 3rd day. i guess this says it all… this is one of the most intricate and yet so calm projects in a while… love all the layers and details in the design. amazing.

  • http://twitter.com/DEDass @DEDass

    NHDRO is in the detail.

  • http://www.rubyyallouz.com.br Ruby

    where are the guests??

  • sara

    this project reminds me why I love architecture so much. thank you for the inspiration.

  • agata

    same as ste and sara. something that's worth the time. inspirational, comfy, subtle, stunning and yet modest. ran straight to their website to check for job opportunities. :) unfortunately, only a product designer ad for now.

  • agata

    oh, looked at it again and realized that the only thing missing is some greenery inside and in the courtyard. easy fix anyway.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001030526674 Scott Armistead

    This is one slick building. Clean lines, interesting textures and finishes. Love the use of new and old. I can't help but wonder about the things that went on in this building while it was a Japanese Army headquarters. So rich in history. This is the pinnacle of remodel work. Fantastic job NHDRO!

  • PaulCB

    I once remodelled a disused brothel into a ship chandler's warehouse and retail outlet with caretakers flat over. The joy of redemption was great and I experience the same in watching these photographs

  • steve h

    After 3500 years of literally obscure history, glass was clarified with manganese oxide in Alexandria in 1st C. and spread by Roman colonisation. Triremes took it to Catalonia,(and the silk road to Chinese kingdoms 1.5 millennia ago). Metal amalgam coated glass mirrors are recorded in 1st C Sidon (and pre-Xinhua of 5thC).The Moors produced mirror glass in 11thC al andaluz. The mirror window was used by Gaudi in the Palau Guell. Old buildings have always been used to make new ones. NHDRO know that , and is why The Waterhouse is meaningful .

  • jannice

    nice, amazing. actually It looks like a refined studio of artists'.

  • openhousebcn

    so beautiful, that a luxury hotel can be left so raw, so basic, and feel so full warmth, because of the character of the building

  • http://twitter.com/Iimpact_Design @Iimpact_Design

    'Design is an opportunity to continue telling the story, not just to sum everything up.' | Tate Linden |